Plows Celebrated Sherry Bitters – Chicago

Plows Celebrated Sherry Bitters

William J. Plows – Chicago

21 April 2019

Glass Works Auctions has a wonderful example of a figural Plows Sherry Bitters in their upcoming ‘Colors of Spring’ Catalog Auction #130. The bottle is pictured at the top of the post, in the grouping above and below. The Plows, in the form of a cluster of grapes, is drop-dead gorgeous. Even the label panel on the reverse is shaped like a grape leaf. The auction opens for bid on April 22nd and closes on April 29th, 2019.

I have not seen this particular example before as it has been nested away for many years with Sidney Genius, a name I’ve heard of, but a person I have not met. Apparently he has or had some great bitters which are now being auctioned by Glass Works over a period of time

Here is the Glass Works Auctions listing:

2. “PLOW’S / SHERRY BITTERS”, (Ring/Ham, P-111), American, ca. 1870 – 1880, amber cluster of grapes, 8”h, smooth base, applied ring mouth. A tiny 3/16” by 1/16” sliver type chip is off the inside edge of the lip. Extremely rare, one of the most difficult to find of the true figural bitters! Sidney Genius Collection. Minimum Bid: $4,000. Estimate: $7,000 – $10,000

The Carlyn Ring and W.C. Ham listing in Bitters Bottles is as follows:

P111  PLOW’S SHERRY BITTERS
PLOW’S ( cd ) / SHERRY BITTERS (cd) // c //
8 x 2 5/8 (5)
Round-bunch of grapes, Amber, NSC, Applied mouth, Extremely rare
Label panel is shaped like a grape leaf.

Notice that the listing above and the embossing on the bottle has no proprietor or manufacturer name, nor a city where it was produced. The copy simply says ‘Plow’s Sherry Bitters.’ There is no Plows advertising, no surviving label, no trade cards, nothing. We all wondered about this bottle until the 1st Chicago Bottle Club cracked the case and posted the following advertisement on their web site. This little ad had it all.

Oh, here is my example pictured below. I love the amber coloration which changes throughout the bottle. The Plows bottles only come in amber, so no color runs here. This example came from American Bottle Auctions, Grapentine I Auction in April 2007. It was previously auctioned by Glass Works Auctions in Auction #48 and noted as ex: Frank Barranco. It has a drippy top, loads of whittle and is a top specimen.

William J. Plows

There is not a terrible amount of information about W. A. Plows. We know that he was born in New York around 1831. In 1855, he was living in New York with his wife Olivia and one child according to the New York State Census. Five years later, an 1860 United States Federal Census lists him working in a saloon in Milwaukee. William J. and his wife are listed with three children, Olivia age 6, Edward age 4 and Gertrude age  2.

William J. Plows leaves Milwaukee and is next found in Chicago in 1866 where he is a partner at Smith & Plows. William J. and Charles R. Smith are selling wholesale wines and liquors at 103 S. Water Street. This partnership ended on March 27, 1867 according to the Chicago Tribune. Plows left while leaving C. R. Smith & Co. to continue with the liquor business. He might have been bought out leaving him some money to finance Plows Sherry Bitters.

Plows must have, in quick order, gone into business with William D. Harris & B. H. Upham as Plows, Harris & Upham is listed in 1867 as liquor dealers located 72 Randolph according to John C. W. Bailey’s Business Directory of Chicago. This is pretty much the same information on the ad posted by the 1st Chicago Bottle Club except their ad also notes that Plows, Harris & Upham were Wholesale Dealers in Alcohols, Cologne Spirits and Foreign and Domestic Liquors and that they were the Manufacturers and Sole Proprietors of “Plows” Celebrated Sherry Bitters. The bottle was probably ordered only once in a group and sold wholesale and retail in 1867.

This partnership would end as Plows is next listed as a partner with Plows, Abel & Humiston (William J. Plows, John Abel and Len S. Humiston) who were liquor dealers located at 154 Dearborn. They were listed in 1867 and 1868. There is some overlap here as Plows must have had a few irons in the stove. A newspaper Dissolution notice for Plows, Abel & Humiston occurred as of April 20, 1869. The notice said that W. J. Plows would continue the wholesale liquor business at 154 Dearborn.

Bitters collectors might be familar with the names John Abel and Len S. Humiston as they put out Mountain Root Bitters.

Read: Abel, Humiston & Co.’s Mountain Root Bitters!

In 1869, W. J. Plows put out notices that he was wanting to sell his old wholesale liquor business cheap so he could go into distilling and rectifying. The 1870 Federal Census lists him as a distiller and all other available listings after this date note that Plows was in the distilling business. His son Edward would join him as a clerk and accountant. In 1875, Plows buys, at a government auction, the distillery of the Union Copper Distilling Company.

In 1878, William J. Plows is listed as the Proprietor of Vienna Coffee located at 65 Dearborn with a residence in Zurich. I guess that these were his golden pasture years. Plows would die in the early 1880s leaving his wife a widow and antique bottle collectors with a great bottle.

Select Listings:

1855: Wm J Plows, Birth Year: abt 1831, Age: 24, Residence: New York City, Ward 19, New York, New York, District: E.D.3, Household number: 29, Line Number: 34, Household Members: Wm J Plows 24, Olivia Plows 19, Livydell Plows 1 – New York State Census, 1855
1860: Wm J Plows, Saloon, Age: 29, Birth Year: abt 1831, Birth Place: New York, Home in 1860: Milwaukee Ward 4, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Post Office: Milwaukee, Dwelling Number: 370, Family Number: 381, Real Estate Value: 100, Personal Estate Value: 500, Household Members: Wm J Plows 29, Olivia Plows 23, Olivia D Plows 6, Edward Plows 4, Gertrude L Plows 2, George Pierce 15 – 1860 United States Federal Census
1866: Smith & Plows (Charles R. Smith and William J. Plows, wholesale wines and liquors, 103 S. Water – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1866
1867: Dissolution of Smith & Plows partnership as of March 27, 1867 – Chicago Tribune, Saturday, March 30, 1867

1867: Plows, Harris & Upham (W. J. Plows, Wm. D. Harris & B. H. Upham), liquor dealers, 72 Randolph – John C. W. Bailey’s Business Directory of Chicago
1867 (presumed): Advertisement: Plows, Harris & Upham (W. J. Plows, Wm. D. Harris & B. H. Upham), Wholesale Dealers in Alcohols, Cologne Spirits and Foreign and Domestic Liquors, Manufacturers and Sole Proprietors of “Plows” Celebrated Sherry Bitters, No. 72 Randolph Street, Chicago – (source unknown)

1867 & 1868: Plows, Abel & Humiston (William J. Plows, John Abel and Len S. Humiston), liquor dealers, 154 Dearborn – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1867 and 1868
1868: A Novel Confidence Game, Water Instead of Whiskey – An Attempted Block Failed – W. J. Plows formerly senior partner of Plows, Harris & Upham – Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, January 22, 1868

1869: Dissolution of Plows, Abel & Humiston (below) as of April 20, 1869. W. J. Plows will continue the wholesale liquor business 154 Dearborn – Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, April 21, 1869

1869: W.J. Plows wanting to sell his old wholesale liquor business cheap so he can go into distilling (below). – Chicago Tribune, Sunday, December 5, 1869

1869: W. J. Plows & Co. (William J. Plows), Wholesale Wines and Liquors, 154 Dearborn – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1869
1870: Wm J. Plows, Distiller, Age in 1870: 39, Birth Year: abt 1831, Birthplace: New York, Dwelling Number: 1897, Home in 1870: Chicago Ward 12, Cook, Illinois, Personal Estate Value: 20,000, Real Estate Value: 15,000, Inferred Spouse: Olivia Plows, Household Members: Wm J Plows 39, Olivia Plows 34, Levidell Plows 16, Edward Plows 14, Gertrude Plows 12, Florence Plows 10, Amy Plows 10, Josephine Plows 8, Maritha Plows 6, William Plows 4, James Plows 2 – 1870 United States Federal Census
1873: William J Plows, Distiller, Edward Plows, clerk, 261 and 233 Kinzie, r. 474 N. LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1873
1874: William J. Plows, Distiller, 263 Kinzie  – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1874
1875: W.M. Plows buys, at government auction, the distillery of the Union Copper Distilling Company – The Inter Ocean (Chicago), Thursday, August 19, 1875

1875: William J. Plows, Distiller and Rectifier, 263 Kinzie (Junker Roelle & Co. at same address) – Lakeside Directory of the State of Illinois, 1875
1877: William J Plows, Agent, 261 Kinzie, r. 212 Schiller, Chicago, Illinois – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1877
1878: William J. Plows, Proprietor Vienna Coffee, 65 Dearborn, res Zurich – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1878
1882: William J Plows, 6 Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois – Chicago, Illinois, City Directory, 1882
1886: Olivia Plows, widow William J. 1539 Wrightwood Avenue – Lakeview, Illinois, City Directory, 1886
Posted in Advertising, Bitters, Figural Bottles, History, Liquor Merchant, Medicines & Cures, Questions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Watkins’ Celebrated & Invigorating Bitters, John R. Watkin’s, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Watkins’ Celebrated & Invigorating Bitters

John R. Watkin’s – Lancaster, Pennsylvania

09 April 2019

I’ve had tucked away and stored in a digital folder, the upper-most advertisement for John R. Watkins, Agent, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors, Raspberryade, Rectified Whiskey and Watkins’ Celebrated Bitters, &c. Watkins was located on the southeast corner of Centre Square in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The advertisement was found in the 1867 Directory of Lancaster County. I’m not familiar with this bitters and I’ve certainly never seen a bottle.

Here is the new listing by Bill Ham within the forthcoming Bitters Bottles Supplement 2:

Advertisement
W 54.8  WATKINS CELEBRATED BITTERS (also Watkin’s Invigorating Bitters, same brand), John R. Watkins & Co., Southeast corner of Centre Square, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Watkins was a wholesale and retail dealer in foreign and domestic wines and liquors, raspberryade, rectified whiskey and Watkins’ Celebrated Bitters, &c. – 1867 Directory of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Here is an odd listing within the first Carlyn Ring and W.C. Ham Bitters Bottles book for another J. R. Watkins bitters bottle. I see no connection. The listing may want to be updated in Bitters Bottles Supplement 2.

W 55 L… Watkins Gen-de-can-dra Stomachic Tonic Bitters
J.R. Watkins Company, from ocean to ocean.
8 1/2
Flask, Amber, ARM
Gen-De-Can-Dra Manufactured only by the J.R. Watkins Medical Company, Proprietors of Dr. Ward’s Remedies, Winona, Minn.
Montreal River Miner and Iron County Republican, Saturday, May 26, 1894
The La Harpe Advertiser, Thursday, February 3, 1921

The J. R.Watkins Medical Company, Proprietors – Montreal River Miner and Iron County Republican, Saturday, May 26, 1894

Watkins Gen-De-Can-Dra – The La Harpe Advertiser, Thursday, February 3, 1921

This advertisement below from the Reading Times 0n Tuesday, December 22, 1868, titled “Health! The Greatest Blessing!” Notice that the bitters is now called Watkins Invigorating Bitters. As typical for most bitters of this time period, the product is touted as being a cure-all for just about everything. The product is again sold wholesale and retail by John R. Watkins, who is noted as being associated with his wine, liquor and porter establishment at Centre Square in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Centre Square in Lancaster

From 1863 to about 1969, John R. Watkins was located on the southeast corner of Centre Square (now Penn Square) and Soldiers Monument in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The Soldiers and Sailors Monument is a 43-foot tall Gothic Revival memorial which stands in Penn Square in downtown Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It was dedicated on July 4, 1874, at its present site on the northeast intersection of King and Queen Streets. The monument’s original intention was to pay tribute to Lancaster Union soldiers killed during the American Civil War. However, today the Soldiers and Sailors Monument also represents those who have served in subsequent American military conflicts.

John R. Watkins

John R. Watkins was born on October 7, 1822 in Wales, Great Britain. He was married in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on November 10, 1853 to Margaret A. Kendig. Their household occupants (besides husband and wife) that were listed in the 1860 United States Federal Census were Anna L. Watkins, Ruth Watkins, John F. Watkins, Philip K. Watkins, Isaac M. Watkins, William J. W. Watkins and John R. Watkins.

Though records are scarce, we see that on February 21, 1857, Watkins was appointed U.S. Postmaster for Lancaster, Pennsylvania. By 1860, the United States Federal Census lists his occupation as an Innkeeper.

In the 1863, 1864 Gopsill´s Directory of Lancaster, Harrisburg, Lebanon and York, Pennsylvania we see John R. Watkins selling Liquors at Centre Square. He is living at 178 N. Queen. Both addresses in Lancaster.

In 1867, we see his first advertisements for Watkin’s Invigorating Bitters and Watkin’s Celebrated Bitters. These were the same brand. That same year, “Watkins purchased the bottling establishment of Mr. Mishler and is now engaged in bottling.” according to the Reading Times.

He would continue advertising the bitters in 1868 and stop in 1869. Watkins would die in 1875.

Read: Mishler’s Herb Bitters and the Mishler Family

Select Listings:

1822: John R Watkins, Birth Date: 7 Oct 1821 1822 – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1853: John R Watkins, Marriage Date: 10 Nov 1853, Marriage Place: Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Father: David D Watkins, Mother: Rachel Watkins, Spouse: Margaretta A KendigPennsylvania, Marriages, 1852-1968
1857: John R Watkins, Appointment of U.S. Postmaster, Post Office Location: Oregon, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Appointment Date: 21 Feb 1857 – U.S., Appointments of U. S. Postmasters, 1832-1971
1860: John R Watkins, Innkeeper, 30, Birth Year: abt 1825, Birth Place: Wales, Home in 1860: Lancaster, North East Ward, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Post Office: Lancaster, Dwelling Number: 190, Family Number: 194, Household Members: John R Watkins 35, Margeret Watkins 28, Anna L Watkins 8, Ruth Watkins 17, John F Watkins 19 (painter), Philip K Watkins 36 (Dentist, New York), Isaac M Watkins 36, William J W Watkins 25 (Slater, Wales), John R Watkins 30 (Slater, Pa) – 1860 United States Federal Census
1863: John R Watkins, Liquors, Centre Sq., h 178 N Queen, Lancaster, Pennsylvania – Gopsill´s Directory of Lancaster, Harrisburg, Lebanon and York, 1863-64
1867: Newspaper advertisement (below) Watkin’s Invigorating Bitters, John R. Watkins, Sole Proprietor, Centre Square, Lancaster, Pa. – Reading Times, Monday, September 30, 1867

1867: Newspaper notice (below) John R. Watkins purchased the bottling establishment of Mr. Mishler and is now engaged in bottling. – Reading Times, Monday, September 30, 1867

1867: Advertisement (top of post) John R. Watkins, Agt. Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors, Raspberryade, Rectified Whiskey, Watkins’ Celebrated Bitters, &c., Southeast Corner of Centre Square, Lancaster, Pa. – 1867 Directory of Lancaster County
1867: Advertisement (below) John R. Watkins, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors, Raspberryade, Rectified Whiskey, London Porter, Watkins’ Invigorating Bitters, Southeast Corner of Centre Square, Lancaster, Pa. – 1867 Directory of Lancaster County

1868: Advertisement (body of post) Health the Greatest Bless, Watkins’ Invigorating Bitters, Centre Square, Lancaster, Pa. – Reading Times, Tuesday, December 22, 1868
1869: John R Watkins, wines and liquors, SE Angle Centre Sq., h W Orange n Prince, Lancaster, Pennsylvania – Directory of Lancaster County, 1869-70
1875: John R Watkins, Death Date: 19 Nov 1874 1875, Cemetery: Lancaster Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Spouse: Margaret A. Watkins – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current

Posted in Advertising, Bitters, Bottling Works, History, liquor, Liquor Merchant | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Cherokee Medicine Company – Galveston, Texas

The Cherokee Medicine Company Galveston, Texas

Is this Lueder “Louis” Koester?

07 April 2019 (Koester jug added late the same day)

Advanced Texas bottle collector Brad Seigler recently sent me a picture of an aqua square embossed The Cherokee Medicine Co. from Galveston, Texas. It is pictured above sitting to the left of an aqua IXL Sarsaparilla & Iodide Potassium from Houston and an amber Dr. Tobin Liver Medicine from Austin. All three of these bottles are extremely rare.

Brad wrote the following about these three bottles over at Antique-Bottles.net:

I went to see my best collector friend this weekend, and managed to get a couple really nice bottles from him. The Cherokee Medicine Company, from Galveston, is the only undamaged example that any of us have seen to date. The only other example to ever come up was posted on this site, but it is badly broken.

The IXL Sarsaparilla looks a lot like the Morley’s sassy from St. Louis, but it is embossed “IXL Sarsaparilla & Potassium Iodide, Dr. R. Cotter, Houston Tex.”

Dr. Richard Cannon owned one of these too, but this one came from Bill Agee’s collection. There is one more that came from eBay a few years back.

The amber Dr. Tobin’s Liver Medicine bottle is from Austin, Texas. I have a small clear one, and there is a large clear one in the same mold as this one. Both of those are rare, but this is the only amber one I have come across to date.

It was a nice day getting to see the Texas countryside, old friends, great bottles and I even got to bring a few bottles home with me. Thanks for looking guys!

In corresponding with Brad, he feels that this aqua Cherokee Medicine Company bottle contained a bitters based partly on the accompanying 1905 advertisement he sent for L. Koester (see below) who was a wholesale liquor dealer in Galveston. He also was the proprietor of Cherokee Bottling Co. which bottled wines, cordials and bitters. It certainly looks like a bitters bottle. Let’s check it out.

First of all, L. Koester stands for Lueder “Louis” Koester who was born on 17 April 1847 in Schönebeck, Bremen, Deutschland, which of course is Germany.

Below you will see the earliest advertisement I could find for Cherokee Bottling Co. which features “Golden and Silver Eagle Bottled Liquors” for sale by Henry Toujouse and J. J. Schott, Druggist and Agents for Galveston. Note that bitters are not referenced, nor is L. Koester. The ad is from The Galveston Daily News, Tuesday, May 27, 1890.

An 1880 Galveston, Texas City Directory first lists Koester working with LeGierse & Company who were wholesale grocers located at 52 Strand. He was residing at Tremont House between O and O 1/2 Streets. The Strand business and historical district is off of downtown Galveston and consists mainly of Victorian era buildings.

In 1894 and 1895, L. Koester was listed as a wholesale liquor dealer and proprietor of Cherokee Bottling Company which specialized in wines, cordials and bitters. He was the agent for Rood & Ross Ciders and Deerfield Mineral Waters and was located at 110 Twenty-Fourth South with a Telephone number of 909.

In all of these ads, there is no mention of The Cherokee Medicine Company so I suspect that Koester used the “Cherokee” name in Galveston. This is a jump as I can find no direct listings for The Cherokee Medicine Company or Koester being tied to it. This probably amplifies the rariety of the bottle. Why advertise for something that barely even existed?

As you might expect, there are other “Cherokee” medicine references in the late 19th and early 20th century. This includes:

1875: A. J. Hunt’s Celebrated Cherokee Bitters (Columbus Courier, Thursday, June 24, 1875) [Kansas] Unlisted The new listing by Bill Ham for the forthcoming Bitters Bottles Supplement 2:

Advertisement
H 213.85  A. J. Hunt’s Celebrated Cherokee Bitters
Columbus Courier, Thursday, June 24, 1875  [Columbus, Kansas]

1875: The good citizens of Rockingham and Page Counties, Virginia disgusted with the practices of illicit venders of intoxicating liquors in Port Republic and Luray selling “Cherokee Bitters.” I think in this case, Cherokee Bitters is a “catch all” name for all quack bitters. (Spirit of Jefferson, Tuesday, January 26, 1875) [Charles Town, West Virginia]

1881: Dr. Brunt, the great Indian medicine man, intends to make a specialty of the manufacture of the renowned Cherokee Bitters. (Osage Mission Journal, Wednesday, January 12, 1881) [Mission, Kansas] This could be related to A. J. Hunt’s Celebrated Cherokee Bitters mentioned above 1875.

1882: J. G. Yeiser, Manufacturer and Proprietor of the Celebrated “Cherokee Bitters,” Rome, Georgia (The Coosa River News, Friday, November 3, 1882) [Centre, Alabama] Unlisted

C 91.3 CELEBRATED CHEROKEE BITTERS, J. G. Yeiser, 81 Broad Street, Rome, Ga,, Manufacturer and Distributor. The Coosa River News, Friday, November 3, 1882, Centre, Alabama

1915: Cherokee Medicine Company (Atlanta) selling Old Indian Liver and Kidney Tonic (The Atlanta Constitution)

I’m sure Koester’s life was interrupted by The Great Galveston Hurricane, known regionally as the Great Storm of 1900 which was the deadliest natural disaster in United States history. The hurricane left between 6,000 and 12,000 fatalities in the United States. Most of the deaths occurred in the vicinity of Galveston after storm surge inundated the entire island with 8 to 12 feet of water. It looks like Koester survived the great storm but records are scarce in the aftermath.

From 1903 to 1905, Koester is listed again as a wholesale liquor dealer and proprietor of Cherokee Bottling Company specializing in wines, cordials and bitters. He is agent for Rood & Ross Ciders and is located at 110 Twenty-Fourth Street in Galveston. In 1906, L. Koester, along with being listed as a wholesale liquor dealer and proprietor of the Cherokee Bottling Co., (wines, cordials and bitters), is also representing the purest of ciders. He was also the proprietor of Seaport Rye and agent for Mallard and Mount Vernon Rye and Chicken Cock Whiskey. He was now located at 2424 Strand, Telephone 909.

The 1908 & 1909 Galveston, Texas City Directory lists the California Wine House, with L. Koester selling wines and liquors addressed at 2010 Market Street, Phone 618. He certainly moved around often with his various addresses in Galveston. Advanced Texas digger Brandon DeWolfe sends in the picture below with the following, “Saw your post about the Cherokee Medicine Co. and L. Koester and thought you might like to see this photo of a jug from him, fresh from a privy about a month ago. To say I was elated would be an understatement!

Louis Koester died on March 7, 1915 in Galveston, Texas. He was 67 years old. His wife was Augusta F. W. Koester and their children were Augusta Genesa Bauss, Pauline Wilameina J. Becker and Herman Koester. Herman would eventually work as a druggist in Galveston. You can see the family in both pictures below. Louis Koester has the Van Dyke beard.

Was Koester the proprietor of Cherokee Medicine Co.? Did he or Cherokee Bottling Co. make a bitters? The jury is out on these questions. More advertising and/or a labeled example might conclude the case.

Select Listings: 

1847: Lueder, Julius “Louis” Koester, Birth 17 April 1847, Schönebeck, Bremen, Deutschland
1880: L. Koester with LeGierse & Co., Wholesale Grocers, 52 Strand, res. Tremont bet. O and O 1/2 – Galveston, Texas – Galveston, Texas, City Directory, 1880
1882: LeGierse & Co. (Morris Lasker, Jake Davis), Importers, wholesale grocers, liquors, wines, tobacco, cigars, ne cor Strand. 24th – Morrison & Fourmy’s Galveston City Directory
1890: Newspaper advertisement (above in post) Golden and Silver Eagle Bottled Liquors for sale by Henry Toujouse and J.J. Schott, Druggist, Agents for Galveston, The Cherokee Bottling Co., Galveston – The Galveston Daily News, Tuesday, May 27, 1890
1894: Newspaper advertisement (above in post) L. Koester, Wholesale Liquor Dealer, Proprietor Cherokee Bottling Co., Wines, Cordials and Bitters, Agent Rood & Ross Ciders and Deerfield Mineral Waters, 110 Twenty-Fourth St., Telephone 909 – The Galveston Daily News, Thursday, September 1, 1894
1895: Newspaper advertisement (below) L. Koester, Wholesale Liquor Dealer, proprietor Cherokee Bottling Company, Wines, Cordials etc., Bottled goods a specialty, 110 Twenty-Fourth St., Telephone 909 – The Galveston Daily News, Thursday, September 1, 1895

1903-1905: Directory advertisement (above in post) L. Koester, Wholesale Liquor Dealer, Proprietor of Cherokee Bottling Co., wines, cordials and bitters etc., Agent Rood & Ross Ciders, 110 Twenty-Fourth St., Telephone 909 – 1905 Galveston, Texas City Directory
1906: Directory advertisement (above in post) L. Koester, Wholesale Liquor Dealer, Proprietor Cherokee Bottling Co., wines, cordials and bitters, also the purest ciders, Proprietor Seaport Rye, Agent for Mallard and Mount Vernon Rye, Chicken Cock Whisker, 2424 Strand, Telephone 909 – 1906 Galveston, Texas City Directory

1908-1909: Directory advertisement (below) California Wine House, L. Koester (Lueder or Louis), Wine and Liquor Dealer, Family Wines a Specialty, 2010 Market Street, Phone 618 – 1908 & 1909 Galveston, Texas City Directory
1910: Lueder Koester, Age in 1910: 63, Birth Year: abt 1847, Birthplace: Germany, Home in 1910: Galveston Ward 7, Galveston, Texas, Street: Avenue P, House Number: 3427, Immigration Year: 1871, Relation to Head of House: Head, Marital status: Married, Spouse’s name: Augusta L Koester, Father’s Birthplace: Germany, Mother’s Birthplace: Germany, Native Tongue: English, Occupation: Own Income, Home Owned or Rented: Own, Home Free or Mortgaged: Free, Farm or House: House, Naturalization Status: Naturalized, Years Married: 36, Household Members: Luedar Koester 63, Augusta L Koester 58, Emily L Koester 22 – 1910 United States Federal Census

1915: Lueder, Julius “Louis” Koester, Death 7 March 1915 (aged 67), Galveston, Galveston County, Texas, Burial, Old City Cemetery, Galveston, Galveston County, Texas, Spouse: Augusta F W Koester, Children: Augusta Genesa Bauss, Pauline Wilameina J. Becker, Herman Koester – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Posted in Advertising, Bitters, Bottling Works, Collectors & Collections, Digging and Finding, History, Liquor Merchant, Medicines & Cures, Questions, Sarsaparilla, Stoneware | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

U.S.A. Hospital Department bottles

U.S. Army Hospital Department bottles

31 March 2019

I’ve always wanted to create a gallery of U.S. Army Hospital Department bottles. The molds, colors and use during the Civil War and later years epitomizes the history and stunning glass in our hobby. I will update this post as more images become available.

There is some really great information on these bottles by Frank Sternad in Bottles and Extras and Robert J. Dalessandro on his Medical Antiques web site. That is also his picture of five U.S.A Hospital Department bottles at the top of this post.

Read: U.S.A. Hosp. Dept. by Frank Sternad

Read: U.S. Army Hospital Department Bottles by Robert J. Dalessandro


Jeff & Holly Noordsy Window Display

An incredible grouping of U.S.A. Hosp. Dept bottles on display – Jeff & Holly Noordsy


FOHBC 2016 Sacramento National | Shootout

Grouping of competing U.S.A. Hospital. Dept. bottles at the FOHBC 2016 Sacramento National Antique Bottle Convention & Expo shootout.

Three finalist U.S.A. Hospital. Dept. bottles at the FOHBC 2016 Sacramento National Antique Bottle Convention & Expo shootout.

Winning U.S.A. Hospital. Dept. bottle at the FOHBC 2016 Sacramento National Antique Bottle Convention & Expo shootout. 1st Place, Richard Siri


FOHBC 2016 Sacramento National | Educational Display

U.S.A. Hospital. Dept.display at the FOHBC 2016 Sacramento National Antique Bottle Convention & Expo – Henry & Cecilia Guillen


Individual Examples

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. With applied top. Star on base. 9 1/2″. A nice example in a very pretty green coloration, we don’t see these with this lime variation that often. This has a nice drippy top and good overall crudity. Here’s another good one if you don’t have the color. This is Almost Mint with just a hint of interior stain. A dazzler and worthy of any U.S.A. collection. – American Bottle Auctions

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. Applied top. Almost 9 1/2″. Here’s the color everyone is looking for, a cobalt blue variation with the applied square collar. Surely a rare bottle, it seems these and the aqua variants were the only quarts with this type collar and could possibly be the first of the U.S.A. bottles made. Regardless, this is a beauty and if you don’t have a blue quart, this may be the last one to come along for a while. A good one it is, too. It is a medium to light blue with a strong strike and lots of long beautiful whittle and overall crudity. This is a top example, which was recently lightly cleaned to perfection. Seriously folks, lots of whittle, perfect condition, crude top, a real gem that grades Almost Mint. – American Bottle Auctions

A U.S.A. HOSP. DEPT. bottle made for US Army. Applied top. When looking for the perfect hospital department bottle, simply a picture of this outstanding specimen might suffice. Crudely applied top, millions of bubbles, hammer whittled, and in an exotic light to medium citron. – American Bottle Auctions

Nearly 6″ in height with 1 3/4″ clear stopper. Embossing is within a 2 1/4″circle. This example we know was found just like it is now since the original stopper was still in it. It fits like a glove. This bottle is a mossy green, has good overall character and a few beautifully and strategically placed bubbles in the shoulder and throughout the piece. We were not aware, but were told by Mr. Peterson, the seller, that stoppers on most, or possibly all. of these type apothecary pieces were blown in clear durable lead glass. This makes sense since they were already making clear stoppers, why go to the trouble of trying to match a colored stopper for a bottle which would be thrown away anyway (safely–thank goodness). At any rate, this is a real nice example in Almost Mint condition. Any apparent roughness on lip or otherwise is simply a reflection of light.- American Bottle Auctions

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. on shoulder. 7 1/4″ with crudely applied lip and smooth base. A fairly light colored USA with simple overall texture on first glance. However, when held in your hand it has a good amount of unevenness to the glass. There are a few scratches but this piece is generally Near Mint and has never been cleaned. A brilliant and delicate color. – American Bottle Auctions

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. Wide mouth aqua. 7 1/2″. A good example of this well-known variant with the wide mouth, probably used for an infinite number of things involving medicine. This was recently cleaned and would grade Near Mint. Color on this is a bluish/green aqua with loads of whittle and a crudely applied top. A good one for the U.S.A. collection. – American Bottle Auctions

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. Quart with applied top. 9 1/4″. A fine apricot or light orange yellow example. This has a nice crude top and lights up any grouping. A good one if you don’t have this color, it is an Almost Mint bottle with some decent crudity. – American Bottle Auctions

Lot: 18 “U.S.A / Hosp. Dept” Medicine Bottle, America, 1860-1870. Cylindrical, medium cobalt blue, applied square collared mouth – smooth base with embossed “X” and center dot, ht. 9 inches; (1/4 inch open surface bubble on shoulder). AAM pg. 535 A rare, beautiful color with a highly whittled exterior surface. Generally fine condition. Dr. Charles and Jane Aprill collection. Price Realized: $9,360 – Heckler Auctions: The Aprill Collection: Blue Bottles & Glass, Session I Premier Auction 172

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. Quart with applied top. An aqua variant of this well known and popular bottle, these aqua variants are harder to find than some people think. Notice that this has the square applied collar similar to the blue example in this auction. In addition, the U.S.A. embossing is curved rather than straight across. This is a nice greenish aqua and has decent overall crudity. There is a tiny polished flake off the front lip, with still a tiny bit of roughness. Very hard to see. Has a little interior dirt. A good addition to any collection, if you don’t have the aqua quart yet, this could be the one. – American Bottle Auctions

USA / HOSP. DEPT (on front) – S D S (on base), Cylindrical,  9 1/4″ high, Golden yellowish with an amber tone, the applied top is a short blob above a short taper, bold embossing. Lots of bubbles in the glass, perfect conditions, fine example in a scarce color. – GreatAntiqueBottles.com

U.S.A. HOSP.DEPT. Applied top. Almost 9 1/2″. Now here’s a special bottle that we knew would be the belle of the ball. An emerald green with just a hint of moss, this bottle differs from the other quarts in a couple ways. First the embossing is a little larger if you compare it to the others. It is also more pronounced. In addition, it has what appears to be a pour spout, which we can’t say if it was done on purpose or just a fluke in production. Beyond those differences, the bottle is also one of the most whittled specimens we’ve ever seen. Just absolutely hammered with loads of overall crudity and character. The glass is easy to see through the middle and darker at the top and bottom. An incredible example, drippy top and all. Aside from a few very light and minor scratches, this one grades close to Almost Mint. A true beauty. – American Bottle Auctions

USA / HOSP. DEPT., yellowish amber, 9 1/4″ high, Smooth Base, nice crude “drippy” applied top, bold embossing, thousands of bubbles in the glass, pristine perfect condition, a very nice example, circa 1860-1870 – GreatAntiqueBottles.com

Read More: The little blue U.S.A. Hospital Bottle

Read More: Civil War “USA Hospital Department” Bottle w/Pontil NR

Posted in Civil War, Color Runs, Display, Medicines & Cures | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dr. D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters

Dr. D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters

28 March 2019

Bill Ham emailed me with a new bitters listing regarding a bottle on eBay that closed last night. See Listing He already assigned the bottle a catalog number which is represented further below. It always amazes me when one of these unlisted bitters shows up. I wonder why it took so long for an example to surface and if there is any information regarding the bottle. This one took me on a wild goose chase.

Ebay Description: Here is a square bitters bottle unlisted in Ring & Ham and any other sources I could find. It is nearly 9” tall with an applied top. It is embossed on three sides: DR. D. SMITH’S // WILD CHERRY / TONIC // BITTERS. It displays well, but at one time the entire neck was broken off and there was a large chip on the side of the lip which was glued back on. You can see this when I used a flash in pictures #6 & #9. There was also a coating on the bottle, but I removed most of it. Not in great condition obviously, but a rare one nonetheless! Please see my other bottles, many of them rare, which will also close on Wednesday, March 27th, 2019.

The new listing by Bill Ham for his forthcoming Bitters Bottles Supplement 2:

S 132.5  Dr. D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters
S 132.5 DR D SMITH’S // WILD CHERRY / TONIC // BITTERS // f //
9 x 2 3/4
Square, Dark amber, LTC, Applied mouth, Extremely rare

So who is this Dr. D. Smith?

I’ve written about a few Dr. Smith’s before who were associated with bitters. This includes Dr. A.H. Smiths Old Style BittersSmith’s Gentian, Dandelion and Yellow Dock Bitters, and Dr. Smith’s Magic Bitters. I do not think our subject eBay bottle is related.

As you might expect, there are a number of other Dr. Smith Bitters listings in Bitters Bottles which include S 120: Smith’s Bitters (N. K. Brown, Montpelier, Vermont), S 121: Dr. C. H. Smith’s American Stomach Bitters from Albany, New York, S 122.5: Smith’s Celebrated Stomach Bitters (B. Smith, Hyde Park, Pennsylvania), S 122.7: G. M. Smith’s Celebrated Club House Bitters, S 123: L…Dr. Smiths Colombo Tonic Bitters (Benjamin Smith, Scranton, Pennsylvania), S 124: Smith’s Druid Bitters, S 125: L…Smith’s Green Mountain Bitters (Dr. J. H. Smith, St. Johnsbury, Vermont), S 125.5: H. Smith Iron & Quinine Bitters from Dedham, Massachusetts, S 126: Dr. Smith’s Ne Plus Ultra Elixir of Life Bitters, S 128: Dr. M. Smiths Stomach Bitters from Louisville, Kentucky, S 129: Smith’s Tonic Bitters (Smith & Rundle, New Orleans, Louisiana), S 130: Smith’s Vegetable Hungarian Bitters, S 131: Smith’s Verbena Bitters (Dr. E. W. Smith, Espyville, Pennsylvania), S 132 and Smith’s Vitalizer Bitters. None of these bitters seem to be relevant.

Interesting that there is a brief listing for a S 133 Dr. Smith’s Wild Cherry Bitters. Could this be our bottle? It might be a reference to the Smith & Morrison bitters featured at the bottom of this post.

There are actually a few other obscure Dr. Smith Bitters out there. This includes Dr. Smith’s Indian Bitters put out by Charles Richardson, Chemist, Wellgate Laboratory in Dundee, Scotland. The newspaper clipping below is from The Courier and Argus, August 12, 1876. Obviously not our Dr. D. Smith. This bitters appears to be unlisted.

The next Dr. Smith’s Bitters reference (below) comes from the The Times Tribune on March 8, 1900. Here a Dr. Ben Smith in Scranton, Pennsylvania was noted as gaining fame for being the proprietor of a tonic known as Dr. Smiths Bitters. Again, not our Dr. D. Smith. This is obviously related to S 123: L…Dr. Smiths Colombo Tonic Bitters (Benjamin Smith, Scranton, Pennsylvania).

From the mid 1880s on, until the early 1920s, I found a number of references to Dr. Smiths Bitters in newspapers without a proprietor reference. As it turns out, Dr Smith’s Bitters was being used as a generic name to reference any bitters. I guess it could have been Dr. Jones too. Three examples are referenced below.

Smith & Morrison | Gaston Delroy Smith

It’s interesting because when I search for information for this bottle I come up with a strong hit for ‘Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters’ put out by Smith & Morrison in Washington, D.C. The proprietor’s were Gaston Delroy Smith and Charles G. Morrison. Both were grocers located at 67 Louisiana Avenue. Note that the bottle is embossed ‘Dr. D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters.’ With no hits coming off a ‘Dr. D. Smith’, I wonder if Smith and Morrison added the ‘Dr’ and ‘D’ to represent ‘Delroy’. Many bitters have a ‘Dr.’ name to give the brand legitimacy as a medicine even though it was full of alcohol and the person was not a doctor. I also wonder if he went by Delroy Smith?

The bitters had a relatively short shelf life in advertising as it first appeared in 1863 with advertising stopping in 1865. That same year their ads state that “This great Panacea has been established 20 years” If the origin was 1845, the following years must have been without advertising. There is even a reference of 100 cases of G. D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters being auctioned in The Baltimore Sun on September 11, 1865. I would suspect the brand had to much competition. Trying to operate a business at the peak of the Civil War must have also been very difficult,

Full-page Directory advertisement for Smith & Morrison (Gaston D. Smith & Charles G. Morrison), Wholesale Dealers in Fine Groceries, Provisions, Teas, Coffees, Wines & Liquors, And Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters, Checkered Store, 67 Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D.C. – Washington, District of Columbia, City Directory, 1865

Select Listings:

1823: Gaston Deroy Smith, Birth Date: 20 Apr 1823, Birth Place: Vermont, Death Date: 18 Sep 1889, Death Place: New York, Cemetery: Oak Hill Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, Spouse: Mary Smith, Children: Mary Gaston Adams, Theodore Smith, William Henry Smith – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1860: C G Morrison, Clerk, Age: 53, Birth Year: abt 1807, Birth Place: New Hampshire, Home in 1860: Washington Ward 2, Washington, District of Columbia, Post Office: Washington, Dwelling Number: 262, Family Number: 271, Real Estate Value: 2000, Personal Estate Value: 1300, Household Members: C G Morrison 53, Mary M Morrison 49 – 1860 United States Federal Census
1862: Newspaper advertisement (below) Oysters – Oysters! at Smith & Morrison’s, 67 Louisiana Avenue – Evening Star, Saturday, December 13, 1862

1863: Quarter-page Directory advertisement (below) Smith & Morrison (GT. D. Smith & C. G. Morrison), Wholesale Dealers in Fine Groceries, Provisions, Teas, Coffees, Wines & Liquors, And Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters, Checkered Store, 67 Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D.C. – Washington, District of Columbia, City Directory, 1864

1863: Gaston D Smith, Grocer, Birth Year: abt 1822, Place of Birth: Vermont, Age on 1 July 1863: Age: 41 Race: White, Residence: District of Columbia, Congressional District: 1st, Class: 2 – U.S., Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865
1863: Newspaper advertisement (below) To Sutlers and Purveyors, Smith & Morrison, No. 67 Louisiana Avenue. S&M are the proprietors of the wall known brand of Old Cabinet Whiskey and Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters – Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), Wednesday, May 20, 1863

1864: Half-page Directory advertisement (below) Smith & Morrison (G.D. Smith & C.G. Morrison), Wholesale Dealers in Fine Groceries, Provisions, Teas, Coffees, Wines & Liquors, And Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters, Checkered Store, 67 Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D.C. – Washington, District of Columbia, City Directory, 1864

1864: Newspaper advertisement (below) G.D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters – Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), August 9, 1864

1865: Full-page Directory advertisement (above in post) Smith & Morrison (Gaston D. Smith & Charles G. Morrison), Wholesale Dealers in Fine Groceries, Provisions, Teas, Coffees, Wines & Liquors, And Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters, Checkered Store, 67 Louisiana Avenue, Washington, D.C. – Washington, District of Columbia, City Directory, 1865
1865: Newspaper advertisement (below) G.D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters, This great Panacea has been established 20 years – Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), June 23, 1865

1865: G D Smith, Grocer, La. Avenue, r. 421 H north, Washington, District of Columbia – Washington, District of Columbia, City Directory, 1865
1865: Newspaper notice (below) Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters &c. at Auction, 100 cases G.D. Smith’s Wild Cherry Tonic Bitters – The Baltimore Sun, Monday, September 11, 1865

1869: Gaston D Smith, Marriage Date: 26 Jun 1869, Marriage Place: District of Columbia, Spouse: Ruth Anna Kline – District of Columbia, Marriage Records, 1810-1953
1889: Gaston Deroy Smith, Death Date: 18 Sep 1889, Death Place: New York, Cemetery: Oak Hill Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, Spouse: Mary Smith, Children: Mary Gaston Adams, Theodore Smith, William Henry Smith – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
Posted in Advertising, Bitters, Digging and Finding, eBay, History, Liquor Merchant, Medicines & Cures, Questions, Tonics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

William J. Reading – Key West, Florida

William J. Reading and his Coffin Flask

Key West, Florida

24 March 2019

I like these little pocket or coffin flasks especially when they have interesting locales embossed on the bottles such as this W. J. READING, KEY WEST, FLA. bottle. This image was found sitting all-alone and misfiled in my database. No idea where I initially found it or who sent it to me. So, is there a story here?

A search online reveals that William J. Reading was living in 1880 in Key West, Florida and working as a wood chopper. He was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts in December 1851. As to why he went to Key West at the most southern part of Florida is a mystery. Surely, wood chopping was more lucrative in Massachusetts. By 1900, he is listed as a liquor and cigar dealer living at 905 Division Street. He is married to Pricilla Reading (37) who was born in Florida. Their children are Leslie Reading (14), Maud Reading (12), William Reading (9), Flora B Reading (7), Gracie Reading (6). Young William Edward Reading would stay in Key West and later work for a cigar factory and ice company. I’m glad he did not choose to move back to Massachusetts to sell ice.

There also is a listing for William J. Reading who worked in one of the Key West Cigar factories. I had thought that most cigar manufacturing came out of Ybor City in Tampa. Once, I had actually watched some older ladies rolling tobacco and making cigars for sale. They were even smoking cigars while they were making each cigar. The picture above depicts female cigar packers on the second story of a cigar factory in Ybor City in 1892.

Scott Tyson responded to a Facebook post where I had pictured the flask and said that he lives near Key West and has never seen an example before. He added that Key West was a huge cigar manufacturing town, not just Ybor City in Tampa. Key West had a large Cuban immigrant population with fairly easy access to the port of Havana, Cuba only 90 miles away. Cuban tobacco was even then known to be of excellent quality, and Key West cigars were sought after and sold all over the United States in the late 19th Century. Many of the cigar rollers were Cubans. Key West still has many of the old cigar factory buildings and the cigar makers cottages, and a few mansions built by the factory owners.

I found the photo above with six men standing in front of the Key West Cigar Factory. The only identified man in the picture is William E. Dubois (1849-1933), standing on the far right. He was born and raised in Ulster County, but left to pursue a career in cigar manufacturing. William proved to be extremely successful at this business venture and was soon involved with four different cigar factories, one in Manhattan and three in Key West.

Marianne Dow also replied on Facebook that she found a W. J. Reading listed as a liquor distributor in 1900 and 1903. She then found a 1930 newspaper report that the Key West landmark ‘William Reading home’ burned down.

So not much is known about this bottle or W. J. Reading. As Scott Tyson commented, cigars and whiskey, make sense. Maybe cigar retailers sold whiskey too. I would agree here.

Select Listings:

1880: William J. Reading, Wood Chopper, Age: 29, Birth Date: Abt 1851, Birthplace: Massachusetts, Home in 1880: Key West, Monroe, Florida, Dwelling Number: 1, Race: White, Gender: Male, Marital status: Single, Father’s Birthplace: N Brunswick, Mother’s Birthplace: Canada, Household Members: William J. Reading 29 – 1880 United States Federal Census
1900: William Reading, Cigar and Liquor Dealer, Age: 48, Birth Date: Dec 1851, Birthplace: Massachusetts, Home in 1900: Key West, Monroe, Florida, Ward of City: 5, Street: Division Street, House Number: 905, Sheet Number: 27, Number of Dwelling in Order of Visitation: 573, Family Number: 617, Race: White, Gender: Male, Relation to Head of House: Head, Marital status: Married, Spouse’s name: Bricilla Reading, Marriage Year: 1885, Father’s Birthplace: Massachusetts, Mother’s Birthplace: Massachusetts, Occupation: Cigar Dealer, Months Not Employed: 0, Can Read: Yes, Can Write: Yes, Can Speak English: Yes, House Owned or Rented: O, Home Free or Mortgaged: F, Farm or House: H, Household Members: , Wilkens Reading 48, Bricilla Reading 37, Leslie Reading 14, Maud Reading 12, William Reading 9, Flora B Reading 7, Gracie Reading 6 – 1900 United States Federal Census
1910: William E Reading, Age in 1910: 19, Birth Year: abt 1891, Birthplace: Florida, Home in 1910: Key West Ward 4, Monroe, Florida, Street: Division Street, Relation to Head of House: Son, Marital status: Single, Father’s Birthplace: Massachusetts, Mother’s name: Priscilla Reading, Mother’s Birthplace: Florida, Native Tongue: English, Occupation: Cigar Maker, Industry: Cigar Factory – 1910 United States Federal Census
Posted in Digging and Finding, Flasks, History, Liquor Merchant, Questions, Tobacco | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reed Brothers – Dealers in Drugs & School Books

Reed Brothers – Dealers in Drugs & School Books

Reed’s Celebrated Overland Bitters

07 March 2019

I like that, …”Dealers in Drugs & School Books” and also “Proprietors of Reed’s Celebrated Overland Bitters.” Here is another super tough, extremely rare bitters. I posted the 1870 advertisement below in Daily Dose last August. Now, as it turns out, a bottle example (pictured above) is in the current American Glass Gallery Auction #22. Thanks to Jeff Burkhardt for calling my attention to this bottle and inspiring this post.

If you notice on the advertisement, the Reed Brothers consisted of John Reed, James Reed and Michael Reed. Their establishment was located on 9th Street, West Side Market Space in Lincoln, Nebraska. Again, they were the Proprietors of Reed’s Celebrated Overland Bitters which is prominently noted on the bottom half of the ad which was found in The Nebraska State Journal on Friday, November 4, 1870.

Reed Brothers

John Reed was the lead and oldest brother of the Reed Brothers. He was born around 1841 in Birmingham, England. His younger brothers, James and Michael were twins born on July 26, 1845, also in Birmingham. All three came to Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory with their mother in 1858. For whatever reason they settled in Nebraska Territory from England, I am unsure. I bet that was quite a change.

The first map below shows Nebraska Territory in 1854. The second map shows Nebraska City and what would soon be Lincoln, Nebraska. Omaha is also marked for reference. The third map is an illustrated map of the Pony Express Route in 1860 by William Henry Jackson, courtesy of the Library of Congress. If you enlarge, you can see Nebraska City as a branch line leading to Fort Kearny. The primary route stated in St. Joseph, Missouri and terminated in San Francisco.

Nebraska would become our 37th state on March 1, 1867 when the first wave of settlement gave the territory a sufficient population to apply for statehood. The capital was moved from Omaha to the center at Lancaster, later renamed Lincoln after the recently assassinated President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

[click images to enlarge]

Nebraska City and Lincoln

We next come across John Reed when he is noted as a 19 year old mail carrier in Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory in an 1860 United States Federal Census. He probably worked for the Overand Express or a subsidiary. The “Overland” reference would eventually be the name of a line of medicines the Reed Brothers would put out, and of course, a reference to their Overland Bitters.

It looks like the Reed brothers first went into the drug business clerking for the drug store of Daniel Whitinger in Nebraska City sometime in the early to mid 1860s. Whitinger was a physician and druggist who was born around 1830 in Indiana. Soon, John would become a partner and the drug store was renamed Reed, Whitinger and Co. They were listed as Wholesale and Retail Druggists in Nebraska City, Nebraska in 1868. John would have been about 27 years old. The twins, James and Michael, would continue to work as clerks. Eventually the firm of James Reed & Bros. was formed and continued for many years in Nebraska City. Whitinger would continue as a physician.

In the spring of 1867, the firm of Reed Brothers was organized and they were located in the newly named Lincoln, Nebraska. This was the only year that they were listed as the Proprietors of Reed’s Celebrated Overland Bitters. Lorenz & Wightman of Penn Glass Works in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania made the bottles as you can see from the base embossing below.

The Carlyn Ring and W.C. Ham listing in Bitters Bottles is as follows:

R 29 Reed’s Overland Bitters
REED’S OVERLAND / BITTERS // f // f // f //
Reed’s Drug Store, 35 Main Street, Nebraska City, Nebraska
Square, Amber, Extremely Rare
Established 1n 1867
L&W” on smooth base, ht. 8 ¾

The Reed Brothers would continued until 1871 when S. S. Brock & Company were announced as the successors to Reed Brothers at the same address on West Side Market Square in Lincoln. James Reed, as noted above would carry the touch in Nebraska City. Market Square eventually became Haymarket Square which is represented below.

American Glass Gallery Listing

“REED’S OVERLAND / BITTERS – NEBRASKA CITY / NEB”, Lorenz & Wightman, Penn Glass Works, Pittsburgh, PA, 1867 – 1872. Medium amber, square with beveled corners, applied sloping collar – “L&W” on smooth base, ht. 8 ¾”; (a bit of minor content haze in the base; a little exterior dullness, primarily on a side label panel, otherwise very near mint). R/H #R29. Extremely rare! Possibly the 1st example of this great Nebraska bitters to be offered at public auction.
This exceedingly rare square from Reed’s Drug Store, Nebraska City, Nebraska, was obviously playing off the name of the famous Overland Trail. The Trail was also known as the Overland Stage Line, an 1860’s Western stagecoach and wagon trail that passed through parts of Nebraska.

Select Listings:

1851: John Reed, Age: 10, Estimated birth year: abt 1841, Relation: Son, Father’s name: James Reed, Mother’s name: Lucy Reed, Where born: Birmm, Warwickshire, England, Civil Parish: Birmingham St George, County/Island: Warwickshire, Country: England, Household Members: James Reed 33, Lucy Reed 34, John Reed 10, James Reed 5, Michael Reed 5, Pheoby Dudley 42 – 1851 England Census
1860: John Reid (Reed), Mail Carrier, Age: 19, Birth Year: abt 1841, Birth Place: England, Home in 1860: Nebraska City, Otoe, Nebraska Territory, Post Office: Nebraska City, Dwelling Number: 116, Family Number: 96 – 1860 United States Federal Census
1860: Daniel Whittinger, Physician, Age: 37, Birth Year: abt 1823, Birth Place: Indiana, Home in 1860: Nebraska City, Otoe, Nebraska Territory, Post Office: Nebraska City, Dwelling Number: 151, Family Number: 126, Real Estate Value: 6000, Personal Estate Value: 3000, Household Members: Daniel Whittinger 37, Leah F Whittinger 31, Charles S Whittinger 5, Nettie Whittinger 3 – 1860 United States Federal Census
37 The “Parallels” are published in F. B. Sanborn, The Life and Letters of John Brown (Boston: Roberts Bros., 1891), 481-83. Daniel Whitinger was a physi­cian and druggist, and Samuel P. Sibley was a shoemaker. Both became active in the Republican Party in the early 1860s and Sibley, as a member of the territorial legislature, voted for an act to abolish slavery in Nebraska. Whitinger’s biography is in Dale, “Otoe County Pioneers,” 2753-57; Sibley’s is in the same source, 2330-33. While these men’s Republican party affiliation suggests support for abolition, if they were Underground Railroad operatives they managed to avoid men­tion as such in any contemporary or recollective accounts. Interestingly, Whitinger owned a farm on the west edge of Nebraska City, about a mile from the Mayhew property. See U.S. General Land Office Tract Books, Vol. 152, NSHS. Garner, Reed, and Vincent have not been further identified. They do not appear in “Otoe County Pioneers.”
1865: Newspaper advertisement (below) Office D. Whitinger’s Drug Store, between 4th and5th Main Street, Nebraska City – Nebraska Advertiser, Thursday, September 7, 1865

1867: Nebraska Statehood. The first wave of settlement gave the territory a sufficient population to apply for statehood. Nebraska became the 37th state on March 1, 1867, and the capital was moved from Omaha to the center at Lancaster, later renamed Lincoln after the recently assassinated President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.
1868: Newspaper advertisement (below) Reed, Whitinger and Co. (John Reed and D. Whitinger) Wholesale and Retail Druggists, Nebraska City, Nebraska (also 1869) – Weekly Nebraska State Journal, Saturday, October 10, 1868

1869: Newspaper notice (below) “Jimmie” Reed, of the firm of Reed Bros., Nebraska City, arrived in town Thursday. looking healthy and parboiled like the rest of us. Reed Bros. stands at the head of the Drug Business in the South Platte Region – The Nebraska State Journal, Saturday, July 17, 1869

1870: Newspaper advertisement (above in post) Reed Brothers (John Reed, James Reed, Michael Reed), Dealers in Drugs & School Books, 9th Street, West Side Market Space, Lincoln, Nebraska, Proprietors of Reed’s Celebrated Overland Bitters, Condition Powders and liniment. – The Nebraska State Journal, Friday, November 4, 1870
1870: Newspaper notice (below) C.C. Radmore, Physician and Surgeon, Orders left at Reed & Bros. Drug Store, Office in Stire’s new building, Lincoln, Nebraska

1870: D Whitinger, Physician, Age in 1870: 40, Birth Year: abt 1830, Birthplace: Indiana, Dwelling Number: 228, Home in 1870: Nebraska City, Otoe, Nebraska, Real Estate Value: 2400, Inferred Spouse: L F Whittinger, Inferred Children: John Whittinger , Mary Whittinger, Susan Whittinger, Thomas Whittinger – 1870 United States Federal Census
1870: M Reed, Drug Store, Age in 1870: 24, Birth Year: abt 1846, Birthplace: England, Dwelling Number: 173, Home in 1870: Nebraska City, Otoe, Nebraska, Father of Foreign Birth: Y, Mother of Foreign Birth: Y, Male Citizen over 21: Y, Household Members: M Reed 24, T Reed 53 – 1870 United States Federal Census
1871: Newspaper advertisement (below) S. S. Brock & Co., Successors to Reed Brothers, West Side Market Square, Lincoln, Nebraska – The Nebraska State Journal, Monday, May 13, 1872

1871: James Reed was married in Circleville, Ohio, March 30, 1871, to Josephine P. Rector, a native of Pickaway County, Ohio. They had two children. Norris Humphey and Dwight James. Mr. Reed is a member of the A., F. & A. M., K. of H., and Royal Arcanum.
1872: Newspaper advertisement (below) Reed Bros., Druggists and manufacturers of proprietary medicines…fame of their “Overland” remedies extends from Missouri to beyond the mountains – The Nebraska State Journal, Wednesday, January 24, 1872

1872: Newspaper advertisement (below) S. S. Brock & Co., Successors to Reed Brothers, Druggists, West Side Market Square, Lincoln, Nebraska – The Nebraska State Journal, Monday, May 13, 1872

1881: Michael Reed was married at Belvidere, Neb., October 4, 1881, to Miss Sallie Hole, a native of Havana, Ill.
Posted in Advertising, Bitters, Digging and Finding, Druggist & Drugstore, History, Liquor Merchant, Medicines & Cures | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Nicholas Longworth – Catawba Wine Bitters

Nicholas Longworth – Catawba Wine Bitters

Cincinnati, Ohio

02 March 2019

Nicholas Longworth was an influential figure in the early history of American wine, producing sparkling Catawba wine from grapes grown in his Ohio River Valley vineyard on hills north of Cincinnati. He was also responsible for Catawba Wine Bitters, and the bottles embossed with the cluster of grapes. Highly desirable to collectors.

The Carlyn Ring and W.C. Ham listing in Bitters Bottles is as follows. The listing may want to be updated.

C 85  Catawba Wine Bitters
CATAWBA / WINE // motif bunch of grapes // BITTERS // motif bunch of grapes //
P.H. Drake & Co. New York Depot 53, 55 & 57 Park Place New York
9 3/8 x 2 3/8 (6 3/4) 1/4
Square, LTC & LTCR, Applied mouth, Green with and without Metallic pontil mark – Rare;
Amber and Puce and without Metallic pontil mark – Extremely rare

Nicholas Longworth

Nicholas Longworth was the founder of the prominent Longworth family in Ohio and considered the first millionaire in Cincinnati. He was also known as the “Father of the American Grape Culture.” Among his many other attributes, Longworth was an attorney, banker, merchant, horticulturalist, abolitionist, author, and an art collector.

Nicholas Longworth was born on January 16, 1783 in Newark, New Jersey. His mother was Apphia Davis Vanderpoel. His father, Thomas Longworth was a Tory or Loyalist who were American colonists who stayed loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. Their very existence was complicated as every British Functionary who refused to betray the trust placed in him was consider a traitor by the Patriots.

By the time Nicholas was born, fines and property confiscations had depleted the family funds. This left young Nicholas with an early life of comparative poverty. Thinking ahead, it was decided to teach Nicholas a trade and give him an opportunity to work with either of his two elder brothers, Joseph and Archibald. One had gone north and the other south. Nicholas chose to move to South Carolina for a brief period where he was a clerk in his elder brothers store. It was said that a careful inventory of young Nicholas’ belongings when he set forth to cross the Alleghenies was, “Six coats, black and blue; one dozen plain and fancy waistcoats; four pairs of silk and eight woolen breeches, six dozen plain and ruffled shirts; and a like number of hose and handerchiefs with cravats.”

“Six coats, black and blue; one dozen plain and fancy waistcoats; four pairs of silk and eight woolen breeches, six dozen plain and ruffled shirts; and a like number of hose and handerchiefs with cravats.”

After a spell, Longworth would leave South Carolina, arriving in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1803. Cincinnati at this point was just a burgeoning town and soon to be a city. 1803 was also the same year Ohio was granted statehood. There, he married Susanna Conner, née Howell, three years his junior who was the daughter of Silas and Hannah (Vaughan) Howell, on Christmas Eve, 1807.

Longworth was a little man, and eccentric in dress, speech, and manner. He was also strong-willed and successful, so that he could afford to do as he wished. Longworth, even with all his interests, was never a political candidate nor held any political office. He was also not a faithful member of any religious organization. Grape-growing would soon dominate his life.

Longworth first studied law under Judge Jacob Burnet, a well-known lawyer of great standing. Burnet was a member of the Territorial councils of Ohio from 1799–1802 and served in the Ohio State House from 1814–1816. He was considered the ‘father of the Ohio constitution’ and was an associate justice of the Ohio Supreme Court from 1821 until his resignation in 1828 to serve as United States Senator.

Even without a formal education, Longworth studied hard and applied himself and was admitted to the bar in Ohio. He practiced as an attorney until 1819 in Cincinnati while buying large tracts of land. He next ventured into real estate, flipping property as his real estate dealings proved more lucrative than law. The property that he bought for a song all those years was now worth millions, and Longworth joined John Jacob Astor as one of the two largest taxpayers in the United States.

Believing Cincinnati to be an ideal location for grape cultivation, Longworth established viticulture as a successful venture on the hills adjoining the city. Along the main highway from east to west during the period of early settlement, Ohio had inevitably seen repeated trials of viticulture, suggested by the combination of southward-facing slopes and broad waters. Longworth would finally make it work.

Planting hundreds of acres and building a large wine-house, Longworth started his vineyards in 1813 and by 1820 became more serious about producing wine that would be a commercial success. At first, he was using foreign vines exclusively and was somewhat unsuccessful until 1828, when he introduced native vines or their seedlings and produced, from the Catawba, and Isabella grape, a wine of a high marketable value. He was also well-known for his experiments with strawberries and published “Buchanan’s Treatise on the Grape, with an Appendix on Strawberry Culture” in 1856.

Besides being a pioneer and leading horticultural expert in his section, Longworth was recognized as an authority in national horticultural matters. His writings, though individually short and now out of date, exercised a wide influence in his day. He might be compared to Isidor Bush who put out Missouri IXL Bitters.

Longworth planted a vineyard of Catawba on the Mount Adams hillside and began making a sparkling wine from the grapes using the traditional method used in Champagne. From the 1830s through the 1850s, Longworth’s sparkling Catawba was being distributed from California to Europe where it received numerous press accolades. He was then producing 100,000 bottles of sparkling Catawba a year and advertising nationally. In the 1850s, a journalist from The Illustrated London News noted that the still white Catawba compared favorably to the hock wines of the Rhine and the sparkling Catawba “transcends the Champagnes of France.” The illustration above represents the Longworth vineyard from the Harper’s Weekly, 24 July 1858.

In the mid-1850s, Longworth sent a case to American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, then living in New York City, who wrote a poem dedicated to Nicholas Longworth titled ‘Ode to Catawba Wine.

This song of mine
Is a song of the Vine
To be sung by the glowing embers
Of wayside inns,
When the rain begins
To darken the drear Novembers.

It is not a song
Of the Scuppernong,
From warm Carolinian valleys,
Nor the Isabel
And the Muscadel
That bask in our garden alleys.

Nor the red Mustang,
Whose clusters hang
O’er the waves of the Colorado,
And the fiery flood
Of whose purple blood
Has a dash of Spanish bravado.

For the richest and best
Is the wine of the West,
That grows by the Beautiful River,
Whose sweet perfume
Fills all the room
With a benison on the giver.

And as hollow trees
Are the haunts of bees,
Forever going and coming;
So this crystal hive
Is all alive
With a swarming and buzzing
and humming.

Very good in its way
Is the Verzenay,
Or the Sillery soft and creamy;
But Catawba wine
has a taste more divine,
More dulcet, delicious and dreamy.

There grows no vine
By the haunted Rhine,
By Danube or Quadalquivir,
Nor on island or cape,
That bears such a grape
As grows by the Beautiful River.

Drugged is their juice
For foreign use,
When shipped o’er
the reeling Atlantic,
To rack our brains
With the fever pains,
That have driven the
Old World Frantic.

To the sewers and sinks
With all such drinks,
And after them tumble the mixer,
For a poison malign
Is such Borgia wine,
Or at best but a Devil’s elixir.

While pure as a spring
Is the wine I sing,
And to praise it,
one needs but name it;
For Catawba wine
Has need of no sign,
No tavern-bush to proclaim it.

And this Song of the Vine,
This greeting of mine,
The winds and the birds shall deliver
To the Queen of the West,
In her garlands dressed,
On the banks of the Beautiful River.

The growing tide of German immigrants coming down the Ohio Valley to Cincinnati liked his wine. Longworth had found a lucrative market and the new German immigrants wanted an affordable, drinkable table wine to continue with the traditions of their homeland, so he enjoyed a virtual monopoly. By this time, Longworth would become one of the wealthiest people in the United States.

A visit to one of Nicholas Longworth’s wine cellars in 1851 revealed 75,000 bottles of sparkling Catawba, and 40,000 or so gallons of wine in casks varying from 40 to 50 gallons each. The cellar was 120 feet long, 40 feet wide and 40 feet deep. Longworth was preparing to double in size his capacity the following spring.

In 1853, Nicholas Longworth partnered with Caspar Zimmermann (Longworth & Zimmermann) to sell the Longworth wines wholesale. They were located at 177 Sycamore in Cincinnati. Anthony, John and Phillip Zimmermann were also part of the business according to a listing in a Cincinnati directory that year. By 1858, the enterprise was called Zimmerman & Co. and was being run by John, Phillip and Anthony Zimmermann. Their ‘chemical laboratory’ was located on the north side of 6th between Freeman and Canal. You see, Longworth wanted to jump on the profitable bitters bandwagon so he needed a partner and laboratory reference so he could call his product a medicine.

In 1859, the first advertisement for Cordial Catawba Bitters was found in a Buffalo, New York newspaper. The bitters was noted for Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Purpose and was being manufactured pure, by Zimmermann & Co., Manufacturing Chemists of Cincinnati, Ohio. They were noted as the successors to Longworth & Zimmermann. By this time, Longworth was fading due to health issues. Longworth’s Catawba Bitters was said to be made from pure Catawba Brandy and warranted to cure the worst cases of Dysentery and Diarrhoea. The ads many times were directed to Civil War soldiers as a remedy for change of climate and fatigue.

There is another Catawba Wine Bitters advertisement for Longworth & Grew, Cincinnati, Ohio noting that George T. Grimes as the Sole Agent in San Francisco. This is puzzling with all the Zimmermann references as there is no reference to a “Grew” in Cincinnati directories who might fit the bill. There is however a J. & B.L. “Crew” noted as grocers on the southwest corner of 3rd and Elm (J. Crew and B. L. Crew) in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1860. This is more likely the reference in the advertisement above.

Another advertisement in 1859 states that J. C. Spalding was selling, from the cargo of the American ship Josiah Bradley, 100 cases of London Jockey Club House Gin and 50 cases Catawba Wine Bitters in Hawaii. So, if you are a digger, and are looking for pontiled examples, might I suggest you head to Buffalo or Honolulu. We see the last advertisements for Catawba Wine Bitters in 1865 in the Black Hawk Daily Mining Journal where cases of the bitters were being sold by J. P. Henry.

I would like to add that I can not say with 100% certainty that the Catawba Wine Bitters bottles that I have associated with Nicholas Longworth are correct but I am pretty darn sure. We will just have to wait until a labeled example is found.

The popularity of Longworth’s wine encouraged a flurry of plantings along the Ohio River Valley and up north to Lake Erie and Finger Lakes region of New York. Longworth would also encourage artists to paint scenes of the Ohio River Valley, and the Ohio River Valley Wine Trail (formerly the Nicholas Longworth Wine Trail), in Southwest Ohio.

In Cincinnati, the Taft Museum of Art on Pike Street now occupies the former residence of Nicholas Longworth. Considered a National Historic Landmark built around 1820 for prominent businessman Martin Baum, it is the oldest domestic wooden structure and is considered one of the finest examples of Federal architecture in the Palladian style in the country. Longworth, during his habitation of the mansion hired African American painter Robert S. Duncanson to paint landscape murals in the foyer, now considered as one of the finest suites of domestic murals dating from before the Civil War. Longworth supported Duncanson, America’s first famous black artist, as a mentor and financed the artist’s trip to Europe where he sold paintings to the Queen of England and other dignitaries. Landscape with Rainbow, 1859 is represented below.

With his success in wine making, Longworth participated in charitable giving throughout Cincinnati, including a noteworthy donation to the land which the Cincinnati Observatory is built on. He was kindly but eccentric and gave much money to what he called the “Devils Poor.”

Longworth was also the great-grandfather of U.S. Congressman Nicholas Longworth IV (a United States House of Representatives from Ohio), and the grandfather of Civil War Union General Nicholas Longworth Anderson.

Nicholas Longworth would die on February 10, 1863 at the age of 80. At his death, his property was valued between $12 and $15 million dollars.

Gallery

The Cincinnati Grape Varieties

The Planters Banner, Thursday, August 11, 1853

Select Listings:

1783: Nicholas Longworth I, Birth Date: 16 Jan 1783, Birth Place: Newark, Essex County, New Jersey – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1830: Nicholas Longworth, Home in 1830: Cincinnati Ward 3, Hamilton, Ohio – 1830 United States Federal Census
1840: Nicholas Longworth, Home in 1840: Cincinnati Ward 1, Hamilton, Ohio – 1840 United States Federal Census
1850: Nicholas Longworth, Age: 67, Birth Year: abt 1783, Birthplace: New Jersey, Home in 1850: Cincinnati Ward 1, Hamilton, Ohio, Value of Real Estate: $2,000,000, Household Members: Nicholas Longworth 67, Susan Longworth 64, Eliza Longworth 33, John L Stetenous 18, Thomas D Carneal 64, Sallie Burk 30, Margarete, Hutchison 45, Mary Jones 25, Eliza Jones 22, Elia Durary 25 – 1850 United States Federal Census
1851: Newspaper notice (below) Visit to N. Longworth’s wine cellars – The Sunbury Gazette, Saturday, November 29, 1851

1853: Longworth & Zimmerman (Nicholas Longworth and Caspar Zimmermann) (also Anthony, John & Phillip Zimmermann), wholesale wine dealers, 177 Sycamore, Cincinnati, Ohio – Williams Directory Company, 1853
1858: Zimmerman & Co. (John, Phillip & Anthony Zimmermann), chemical laboratory, n.s. 6th b. Freeman and Canal, Cincinnati, Ohio – Williams Directory Company, 1858
1858: A menu from the Gibson House, Cincinnati, dated 15 November 1856. Sparkling Catawba from the local vineyards is listed on the same terms as some distinguished grandes marques  from Champagne; so, too, among the “Hocks,” one finds “Buchanan’s Catawba” listed along with Marcobrunner and Rudesheimer. – California State University, Fresno, Library

1859: Newspaper advertisement (below) Cordial Catawba Bitters for Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Purposes, Manufactured Pure, by Zimmermann & Co., Manufacturing Chemists of Cincinnati, O. And Successors to Longworth & Zimmermann – Buffalo Courier, Monday, July 11, 1859

1859: Newspaper advertisement (below) J.C. Spalding selling from the cargo of the American ship Josiah Bradley 100 cases London Jockey club house gin and 50 cases Catawba wine bitters – The Pacific Commercial Advertiser (Hawaii), Wednesday, September 28, 1859

1860: Nicholas Longworth, Age: 78, Birth Year: abt 1782, Birth Place: New Jersey, Home in 1860: Cincinnati Ward 1, Hamilton, Ohio, Post Office: Cincinnati, Dwelling Number: 470, Family Number: 773, Real Estate Value: $1,500,000, Personal Estate Value: $200,000, Household Members: Nicholas Longworth 78, Susan Longworth 73, John L Stettimers 27, Mary L Stettimers 24, Eloise Stettimers 3, Henry O Stettimers 1, Margret Hidson 45, Bridgt Odonnell 20, Johanna Nolan 19, Christopher Stemfelt 22 – 1860 United States Federal Census
1860: P Zimmermann, Wine Merchant, Age: 33, Birth Year: abt 1827, Gender: Male, Birth Place: Bavaria, Home in 1860: Delhi, Hamilton, Ohio, Post Office: Cincinnati, Dwelling Number: 243, Family Number: 251, Occupation: Wine Merchant, Personal Estate Value: 300, Household Members: P Zimmermann 33, Augusta Zimmermann 35, Ferdinand Zimmermann 5, Antone Zimmermann 3 – 1860 United States Federal Census
1860: Newspaper advertisement (below) Cordial Catawba Bitters for Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Purposes, Manufactured Pure, by Zimmermann & Co., Manufacturing. Chemists of Cincinnati, O. And Successors to Longworth & Zimmerman – Buffalo Courier, Friday, February 3, 1860

1860: Newspaper advertisement (below) Catawba Wine Bitters, Longworth & Grew, Cincinnati, Ohio, Geo. T. Grimes, Sole Agent for San Francisco – Sonoma Democrat, March 1860

1860: J. & B.L. Crew, Grocers, s.w.c. 3d and Elm (J. Crew and B.L. Crew), Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, Ohio, City Directory, 1860
1861-1865: Zimmermann & Co., (John, Philip & Anthony Zimmermann), Manufacturers of Catawba Wines and Brandies, 586 and 588 W. 6th, Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, Ohio, City Directory, 1861
1863: Nicholas Longworth I, Death Date: 10 Feb 1863, Death Place: Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, Cemetery: Spring Grove Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, Spouse: Susannah Longworth, Children: Elizabeth (Longworth) Flagg (1809-1891), Joseph Longworth (1813-1883), Mary (Longworth) Stettinius (1808-1837), Catharine (Longworth) Anderson (1815-1893) – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1863: Newspaper advertisement (below) George W. Pomroy selling Catawba Wine Bitters, Zimmerman & Co., late Longworth & Zimmerman – Hartford Courant, Saturday, May 16, 1863

1863: Newspaper advertisement (below) Longworth’s Celebrated Catawba Bitters for sale by Geo. W. Pomroy, Sole Agent, Hartford, Ct. – Hartford Courant, Tuesday, August 4, 1863

1863: Newspaper advertisement (below) Native Wines and Brandy for the Holidays, Zimmermann & Co. native wine and brandy depot, No. 22 Duane Street, late partners to N. Longworth, Cincinnati – The New York Times, Thursday, December 31, 1863

1866: Newspaper advertisement (below) Wines, From the Longworth Vineyards and Wine House, Cincinnati, W.P. & F.P. Anderson, Proprietors – The Montgomery Advertiser, Saturday, December 29, 1866

1867: Zimmermann & Co., (Philip Zimmermann) Manufacturers of Sparkling Wines and Brandy, and Dealers in Whisky, 168  W.Court, Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, Ohio, City Directory, 1867
1868-1869: Longworth’s Wine House, W.P. Anderson, Proprietor, 113 E. 6th, Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, Ohio, City Directory, 1868, 69
1870: Philipp Zimmermann, Distillery, Age in 1870: 43, Birth Year: abt 1827, Birthplace: Bavaria / Bayern, Dwelling Number: 425, Home in 1870: Cincinnati Ward 18, Hamilton, Ohio, Father of Foreign Birth: Y, Mother of Foreign Birth: Y, Male Citizen over 21: Y, Personal Estate Value: 100,000, Inferred Spouse: Augusta Zimmermann, Inferred Children: Ferdinand Zimmermann, Anton Zimmermann, Fred Zimmermann, Regina Zimmermann, John ch Zimmermann, Household Members: Philipp Zimmermann 43, Augusta Zimmermann 35, Ferdinand Zimmermann 16, Anton Zimmermann 12, Fred Zimmermann 10, Regina Zimmermann 5, John ch Zimmermann – 1870 United States Federal Census
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Missouri IXL Bitters – Isidor Bush

Missouri IXL Bitters – Isidor Bush

27 February 2019

Isidor Bush (or in Europe, Busch) has his name on the extremely rare Missouri IXL Bitters bottle which to me is quite amazing. I’ve only personally seen this bottle once and that was at the FOHBC 2015 Chattanooga National Antique Bottle Show when bitters collector, Brad Shultis, carefully unwrapped the bottle to show me. The image at the top of the post was taken at the show. Actually, there is so much more to this bottle and the man behind it.

The Carlyn Ring and W.C. Ham listing in Bitters Bottles Supplement is as follows:

M 104.5  Missouri IXL Bitters
MISSOURI IXL in frame BITTERS // f // ISODOR (Spelled ISIDOR on bottle) BUSH & CO. // sp //
9 x 2 1/2
Square, Amber, LTC, Applied mouth, 3 sp, Extremely rare
Example was dug in Pekin, Ill. with 1860s items. Name correctly spelled on bottle.

Isidor Bush

Isidor Bush was born in the Prague, Bohemia on January 15, 1822. He was the great-grandson of Israel Honig Edler von Honigsberg, who was the first Jew raised to nobility in Austria. As a child, Isidor was favored by his father Jacob as his mother, Fredericka had died when he was only three years old. Isidor Bush was privileged and was able to surround and associate himself with many Jewish intellectuals while growing up.

Bush was somewhat of a Renaissance man in that he was, among other things, an author, publisher, journalist, grocer, banker, railroad freight agent, politician, abolitionist, insurance agent, civic leader, philanthropist, capitalist, patriot, wine and liquor merchant,  and a viticulturalist, one of the first grape growers and wine producers in Missouri.

When Isidor was fifteen years old, he moved to Vienna and worked at Schmid’s Oriental Printing Establishment, which his father had acquired. At this young age, Bush became engrossed in the printing business and turned to the study of languages. Soon he could read and write in Greek, Latin and Hebrew along with his native German. For six years (1842–47), Bush edited and published the Kalendar und Jahrbuch für Israeliten among many other important works. Eventually, Bush became a partner and a leading book pioneer and publisher in Vienna and the firm was renamed Schmid and Busch.

With the Austrian Empire Revolution in 1848, Bush had to flee to America and settled in New York City along with many other liberal Jewish intellectuals. He arrived on January 8, 1849 with his wife Theresa Taussig who he married in 1844 and their son Raphael. There Bush opened a store that sold newspapers and stationery. On March 30, 1849, Bush founded and published the first issues of Israel’s Herald, the first Jewish weekly in the United States which was patterned after the journal he had published in Vienna. Unfortunately, the effort failed financially, so Bush had to stop operations after only three months.

With little available funds, Bush moved to St. Louis, Missouri in the summer of 1849 where his wife’s family, the Taussig’s had settled. There Bush entered into partnership with his wife’s father Charles Taussig, in the firm of Bush & Taussig. They were one of the leading merchants in the city specializing in groceries and hardware located at Carondelet and Park Avenue. Bush and Taussig would run the general store successfully on the south end of St. Louis for many years.

Isidor Bush became a naturalized citizen in 1854 and ardently opposed slavery and championed the Union cause. In 1857, Bush helped incorporate and was made president of the Peoples’ Savings Bank in St. Louis. In the late 1860s he was also president of the Mechanics Savings Bank, and later served as actuary for the German Mutual Life Insurance Company.

When the Missouri Convention was called to determine whether the state should join in the secession movement, Bush was chosen a member on the Unconditional Union ticket, and was made a member of the Committee of Nine, to which most important matters were referred such as abolishing slavery and forming a new constitution. He was also elected a member of the Missouri state board of immigration to repair losses in population resulting from the war, which post he retained for twelve years.

Despite many successful endeavors, Bush never really became a wealthy person in the traditional sense. He certainly suffered his share of financial setbacks but typically was able to rebound, take care of his debts and move on. He was always on the forefront of thought and innovation and prospered sufficiently to position him as a leader in the Jewish Community and the city of St. Louis. One of those associations that Bush was prominent in was the B’nai B’rith, the famous national Jewish fraternal and philanthropic organization. His achievements within the organization were substantial. Bush also served on the City Council and Board of Education in St. Louis as he held public education in high regard.

Bush apparently suffered physical disabilities in a fire when he was a child that prohibited full military service, so he assisted the Union cause in other ways. When Gen. John C. Fremont (the Pathfinder) took command in 1861, with headquarters in St. Louis, Bush was made his secretary and aide-de-camp, with the rank of Captain. He submitted to Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon P. Chase a plan for a government loan of one hundred million dollars, similar to the famous Rothschild premium loans of Austria. Chase feared its rejection by Congress, but was impressed with Bush’s financial genius, and offered him a Treasury clerkship.

Bush refocused after the Civil War back to St. Louis, and became for six years the auditor and general freight and passenger agent for the St. Louis and Iron Mountain Railroad Company. He later would become director of the railroad, serving until 1865 when the line was taken over from New York by financier Jay Gould and the State foreclosed its liens on the railroad.

Next, Bush partnered in the real estate firm of Barlow, Valle & Bush. Interesting enough, Bush was able to purchase many tracts of land south of the city in Jefferson County that were next to the railroad tracks and Mississippi River. The first tract was purchased in February and March 1865 and included 241 acres near the present-day town of Pevely. He had become familiar with this land during his years with the Iron Mountain Railroad. This land was ideal as his research assured him that the land was adaptable for growing grapes and fruits while having an excellent steamboat landing.

Owning this land would play out as Bush became interested in wine-making and created the Isidor Bush Wine Company. He called all his land “Bushberg,” which of course he named after himself. The image above shows the town of Bushberg facing the river in 1880. It was at one time a thriving community complete with steamboat landing, railroad station, post office, wood yard, hotel and a saloon. The image below shows the Isidor Bush house. Both images courtesy of the Missouri Historical Society.

Bush even had the foresight to send his son Raphael to apprentice with viticulturalists in Hermann, Missouri and Cincinnati, Ohio to learn the trade. Their grocery business had suffered during the Civil War and the senior Bush wanted to spare his son from the whims of commercial life. He also felt that agriculture was a more noble Jewish pursuit.

By 1868, the vineyard had nine acres with 20 varieties of grapes. That year the vineyard purchased the post office to handle its growing mail-order business as the company was extremely successful in raising grapes and became known for its products. Before long, Bush was considered a leading expert in viticulture. He even sent large quantities of cuttings from his vineyards to France to replace the ravages there by phylloxera as his wild American vines had a greater resistance to the root louse. In 1871, Bush hired Gustavus E. Meissener who was operating a nursery in Waterloo, Iowa to become his foreman at Bushberg. He would eventually become a partner in the wine growing and vineyard business. You can see his name on the catalogue below.

Bush, after years of preparation, published his first catalogue of grapes in 1869-70 called the Illustrated Descriptive Catalogue of Grape Vines, Small Fruit and Seed Potatoes. The vineyards’ reputation had spread in the 1870s so The Bushberg Catalogue evolved and only focused on grapes. This catalogue went through a number of generations and was translated into several languages with international acclaim. The catalog contained two major sections. The Grape Manual’ contained a history of grape culture and the latest information about grape growing, and the ‘Descriptive Catalogue’ described and listed native varieties, histories and characteristics. Later editions included testimonials from prominent grape growers, horticulturalists and agriculture official plus related advertising to the trade.

In 1870, Bush and his son Raphael organized the firm of Isidor Bush & Son to run the wholesale and retail trade which grew into one of the most successful wine and liquor enterprises in St. Louis. Their primary address was 314 Elm Street. It was during this period that the Missouri IXL Bitters was produced. I have only seen one example. I believe it was dug in Pekin, Illinois before it came to its present owner.

The northern California wine business was rapidly growing by the end of the 1800s and impacted the Bush wine business. There seemed to be less demand for his vines and his research. The vineyard would close in 1895. The town of Bushberg would cease to exist.

Isidor Bush died in St. Louis on August 5, 1898 and is buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery. His wife Theresa had previously died in 1893. Isidor Bush was a admired person and was considered one of St. Louis’s finest citizens. He also had his name on a bitters bottle.


Stock certificate for $200 of stock of Frederic Munch [Friedrich Muench] in the Bluffton Wine Company, signed by Isidor Bush and George Husmann, May 25, 1867 – Muench Family Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis, Missouri.

Select Listings:

1822: Isidor Bush, Birth Date: 15 Jan 1822, Birth Place: Prague, Okres Praha, Prague Capital City, Czech Republic – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1850: Isidor Bush, Merchant, Age: 28, Birth Year: abt 1822, Birthplace: Austria, Home in 1850: St Louis Ward 3, St Louis (Independent City), Missouri, Gender: Male, Family Number: 793, Household Members: Isadore Bush 28, Theresa Bush 25, Raphael Bush 5, Alfred Young 15, Charles Taussig 31 – 1850 United States Federal Census
1857: Bush & Taussig (Isidor Bush), wholesale and retail grocers and hardware dealers, se. c. Carondelet and Park Ave., St. Louis – St. Louis Directory, R.V. Kennedy & Company, 1857
1863: Isidor Bush, General Agent, St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad, office, cor. Main and Plum, St Louis, Missouri – St Louis, Missouri, City Directory, 1863
1864-1865: Isidor Bush, general freight and passenger agent Iron Mountain Railroad, r. Fulton, bet.Barry and Marion, St Louis, Missouri – St Louis, Missouri, City Directory, 1865
1865: Isidor Bush, Insurance Agent, Tax Year: 1865, State: Missouri – U.S. IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918
1870: Isidor Bush, Grape Grower, Age in 1870: 49, Birth Year: abt 1821, Birthplace: Austria, Dwelling Number: 178, Home in 1870: Joachim, Jefferson, Missouri, Personal Estate Value: 21865, Real Estate Value: 50000, Inferred Children: Raphiel Bush, Household Members: Isidor Bush 49, Raphiel Bush 26, Theresa Bush 47 – 1870 United States Federal Census
1870: Isidor Bush & Son, Wine Manufacturer and Dealer, 22 S. Main, St Louis, Missouri – St Louis, Missouri, City Directory, 1870
1878: Isidor Bush & Co. (Isidor Bush, Raphael Bush), Wines, Elm, se cor. 4th, St Louis, Missouri *also Isidor Bush & Son & Meissner) – St Louis, Missouri, City Directory, 1878
1880: Isidor Bush, Nurseryman, Age: 58, Birth Date: Abt 1822, Birthplace: Austria, Home in 1880: Joachim, Jefferson, Missouri, Dwelling Number: 433, Marital status: Married, Spouse’s name: Teresa Bush, Father’s Birthplace: Austria, Mother’s Birthplace: Austria, Household Members: Isador Bush 58, Teresa Bush 56 – 1880 United States Federal Census
1882-1885: Isidor Bush & Co. (Isidor Bush, Louis Klein, Raphael Bush), Liquors, Wholesale, 314 Elm, se cor. 4th, St Louis, Missouri *also Isidor Bush & Son & Meissner, (Isidor Bush, Raphael Bush, Gustavus E. Meissner), winegrowers, vineyards, Bushberg, office 314 Elm – St Louis, Missouri, City Directory, 1882, 1883, 1885
1887: Isidor Bush & Co. (Isidor Bush, Louis Klein, Raphael Bush), Liquors, Wholesale, 213 and 215 S. 2d, St Louis, Missouri *also Isidor Bush & Son & Meissner) – St Louis, Missouri, City Directory, 1887
1893:  Newspaper Notice (below) Theresa Bush death. – St. Louis Post Dispatch, Saturday, July 15, 1893

1898: Isidor Bush, Death Date: 5 Aug 1898, Death Place: Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, Cemetery: Bellefontaine Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Saint Louis, St. Louis City, Missouri, Spouse: Teresa Bush – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1898: Newspaper Notice (below): Death of Isidor Bush St. Louis Post Dispatch, Friday, August 5, 1898

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Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters – Ball, Lyons & Co.

Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters

Ball, Lyons & Co. and I. L. Lyons & Co., New Orleans

24 February 2019

Did you know that Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters was named after an Irish tune for drinking and a quickstep dance? The song was selected as a marching tune for American military formations, including General George Armstrong Custer’s 7th Cavalry Regiment. Listen to Tune.

Isaac Lazarus Lyons was born in 1837 and educated in Columbia, South Carolina. His father was Jacob C. Lyons who would open and run a successful grocery store in Columbia in 1827. The business earned its reputations as an oyster saloon for students from South Carolina College.

Isaac would spend his childhood in Columbia moving to New Orleans just before the outbreak of the Civil War. He enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private, saw a great deal of service and was later promoted to Captain.

After the war, Lyons returned to New Orleans and in 1866 engaged in the wholesale drug business under the firm name of Tucker & Lyons. In 1867, Ball, Lyons & Co. formed when Joseph Tucker retired disposing of his interest to William Ball, late of Wheelock, Finlay & Hall. By 1869, Ball, Lyons & Co. was run by partners, William Ball, Isaac L. Lyons and W.H. Dashiell. They were listed as wholesale and retail druggists located at 42 and 44 Camp, and 115 and 117 Gravier Streets in New Orleans, Louisiana. They carried a large stock of drugs, medicines, chemicals, patent medicines, paints, oils, varnishes, brushes, perfumery, cosmetics, fancy goods, soaps, surgical instruments, window glass, glassware etc. plus pure liquors, wines, ales and porters. They really had quite an operation.

I. X. 7. X. 69.

1869 is also the first year we see advertising for the celebrated Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters which is usually accompanied by the cryptic typography, I. X. 7. X. 69 which I suspect is a reference to the bitters inception date and maybe the 7th Calvary. The bitters were advertised as being manufactured at home from the best and purest materials based on Peruvian Bark.

The bitters was directed to travelers, pioneers, miners, sea-going men, pilots and all persons navigating rivers, lakes and bayous and for persons living on the same as they may inhale the fog which was injurious to the nervous system of man. The bitters was said to be a sure preventative and cure for swamp fevers, bowel complaints and that it would cure the bites of serpents or venomous insects.

It was also particularly recommended to females as a mild, agreeable, strengthening tonic. Of course it was said to cure a number of other afflictions such as dyspepsia, indigestion, liver complaint, jaundice, nervous debility, chronic diarrhea, scrofula, ulcers, spinal diseases and all diseases arising from derangement, oil the liver, impurity of the blood or affection of the intestines or kidneys. Basically, the bitters would fix any problem.

Ball, Lyons & Co. were also listed as the proprietors of Pure Cod Liver Oil, Essence of Jamaica Ginger, Flavoring Extracts, Nectar Syrup, Abraham’s Tetter and Ringworm Ointment, Abram’s Compound Arnica Liniment and Abram’s Southern Vegetable Chill Tonic. They also represented Dr. Benjamin Brodie’s Astringent Cordial, Dr. Lecock’s Cough Elixir, Abram’s Compound Concentrated Fluid Extract of Buchu, Abram’s Compound Fluid Extract of Sarsaparillsa with Iodine of Potassium and Elixir of Calisaya and Iron.

In 1874, the partnership between Ball and Lyons ends and I. L. Lyons & Co. is announced as the successor to Ball, Lyons & Co. They remain at the corner of Gravier and Camp Streets and were listed as wholesale druggists and manufacturing chemists. They would operate for decades with great success as the images below indicate.

Isaac L. Lyons began selling his nectar syrup to K & B Drugstores in the 1880s, who made it into nectar sodas, nectar cream sodas, and nectar ice cream sodas at their fountains. As in Cincinnati, this became a very popular flavor and other drugstores – Schweighardt’s, Bradley’s, Berner’s, and Walgreen’s – bought the syrup from Lyons and served this flavor. By the turn of the 20th century nectar sodas were a signature flavor of New Orleans.

Isaac L. Lyons was very prominent in New Orleans and was identified with many charitable and civic movements in his home city and was a member of the first board of control of the National Wholesale Druggists Association in 1882. He was at one time a director of Kingsley House, and was connected for a long time with the child welfare movement. He was a member of the Chess, Checker and Whist Club, the Boston Club and the Country Club.

Isaac L. Lyons would die after a prolonged illness at 86 years old on November 14, 1923 at his residence on 2344 St. Charles Avenue.

Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters

Two (2) full-column Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters advertisements, Ball, Lyons & Co. – The Times Picayune, Wednesday, October 6, 1869 and Thursday, June. 23, 1870

The Carlyn Ring and W.C. Ham listing in Bitters Bottles is as follows:

O 96  Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters
GARRY. OWEN / STRENGTHENING / BITTERS // BALL LYONS & CO /
NEW ORLEANS, LA // SOLE / PROPRIETORS // f //
9 1/8 x 2 3/4 (6 3/4)
Square, Amber, LTC, Applied mouth, scarce
Garry Owen was the marching song for Custer’s Seventh Cavalry.

I. L. Lyons & Co. advertising noting Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters – Central America, Edward A. Lever, 1885

Select Listings:

1827: New Grocery Store, Jacob C. Lyons in Columbia, South Carolina – Columbia Telescope, 09 November 1827

1837: Isaac Lazarus Lyons, Birth: 1837, South Carolina, Father: Jacob Cohen Lyons, Mother: Louisa Elizabeth Lyons, Spouse: Eva Lyons, Children: Randolph Lyons, George J. Lyons – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
1850: Isaac Lyons, Age: 13, Birth Year: abt 1837, Birthplace: South Carolina, Home in 1850: Columbia, Richland, South Carolina, Household Members: Jacob C Lyons 43, Louisa Lyons 37, Isaac Lyons 13, Rachel Lyons 12, Louisa Lyons 8, Randolph Lyons 5, Isabella Lyons 4, Jacob Lyons 3, Theodore Lyons 0 – 1850 United States Federal Census
1860: Isaac Lyons, Clerk, Age: 23, Birth Year: abt 1837, Birth Place: South Carolina, Home in 1860: Philadelphia Ward 5 Southern Division, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Post Office: Philadelphia, Dwelling Number: 531, Family Number: 695, Household Members: Isaac Hart 70, Abraham Hart 50, Louisa Hart 40, Isaac Lyons 23, Mary McBride 18 – 1860 United States Federal Census
1867: Newspaper Notice (Below) Ball, Lyons & Co. formed. Mr. Joseph Tucker retires from the drug firm Tucker & Lyons disposing of his interest to Wm. Ball, late of Wheelock, Finlay & Hall. J.L. LyonsThe Times Democrat, Sunday, December 8, 1867
1868: Tucker & Lyons (I.L. Lyons) New Orleans, Louisiana – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1868
1868: Ball, Lyons & Co. (J.L.. Lyons) – New Orleans, Louisiana – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1890
1868: Newspaper Advertisement (Below) Ball, Lyons & Co., Wholesale Druggists (W. Ball, L.H. Lyons, W.H. Dashiell) – The Times Picayune, Tuesday, February 25, 1868

1869: Ball, Lyons & Co. (William Ball, I. L. Lyons, W.H. Dashiell), wholesale and retail druggists, 42 and 44 Camp, and 115 Gravier, New Orleans, Louisiana – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1869
1869: Newspaper Advertisement (above in post) Full-column Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters advertisements, Ball, Lyons & Co. – The Times Picayune, Wednesday, October 6, 1869
1870: Newspaper Advertisement (above in post) Full-column Garry Owen Strengthening Bitters advertisements, Ball, Lyons & Co. – The Times Picayune, Thursday, June. 23, 1870
1872: Ball, Lyons & Co. (William Ball and I. L. Lyons), wholesale and retail druggists, 42 and 44 camp, New Orleans – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1872
1874: Newspaper Notice (below) Dissolution of Copartnership between William Ball and J.L. Lyons – The Times Picayune, Thursday, January 29, 1874

1875: Newspaper Advertisement (below) I. L. Lyons Successor to Ball, Lyons & Co., Wholesale and Retail Druggist, Corner Gravier and Camp Streets – The New Orleans, Bulletin, Wednesday, September 1, 1875

1880: Isaac L. Lyons, Druggist, Age: 42, Birth Date: Abt 1838, Birthplace: Georgia, Home in 1880: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, Street: North St Charles Street, House Number: 497, Dwelling Number: 10, Spouse’s name: Ellen J. Lyons, Father’s Birthplace: Georgia, Mother’s Birthplace: Georgia, Household Members: Isaac L. Lyons 42, Ellen J. Lyons 32, George J. Lyons 8, Eva J. Lyons 4, Issac L. Lyons 5/12, Thomas H, Lyons 30, Lucius F. Lyons 25 – 1880 United States Federal Census
1885: Newspaper Advertisement (above in post) I. L. Lyons & Co. advertising noting Garry Owen Strengthening BittersCentral America, Edward A. Lever, 1885
1890: City Directory Listing (Below) I. L. Lyons & Co., Successors to Ball & Lyons, Importers, Wholesale and Retail Druggists, Proprietors of Garry Owen Bitters, 42 and 44 Camp Street, 109-117 Gravier, New Orleans, Louisiana – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1890

1895: I. L.Lyons & Co. (I.L., J.C. and Theadore H. Lyons and John W. Phillips), drugs, 222 and 226 Camp, telephone 794, New Orleans – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1895
1900: Isaac L Lyons, Wholesale Drug Store, Age: 63, Birth Date: May 1837, Birthplace: South Carolina, Home in 1900: New Orleans Ward 10, Orleans, Louisiana, Ward of City: 10, Street: St Charles Avenue, House Number: 2344, Spouse’s name: Eva J Lyons, Marriage Year: 1867, Father’s Birthplace: Pennsylvania, Mother’s Birthplace: Pennsylvania, Household Members: Isaac L Lyons 63, Eva J Lyons 52, George J Lyons 28, Frellsen H Page 23, Eva L Page 24, Frellsen H Page 2/12, Angele Hazeur 47, Babette Hopkins 59, Sarah Carston 23, Dennis Burns 31 – 1900 United States Federal Census
1902: City Directory Listing (Below) I. L. Lyons & Co., (I.L. Lyons, J.C. Lyons, Theodore H. Lyons and John W. Phillips), Importers, Wholesale and Retail Druggists, Proprietors of …, 222, 234 and 226 Camp Street and 529 – 546 Gravier Street, New Orleans, Louisiana – New Orleans, Louisiana, City Directory, 1902

1910: Isaac L Lyons, Wholesale Retail Druggist, Age in 1910: 72, Birth Year: abt 1838, Birthplace: South Carolina, Home in 1910: New Orleans Ward 10, Orleans, Louisiana, Street: Scharles Avenue, Marital status: Married, Spouse’s name: Eva Lyons, Father’s Birthplace: South Carolina, Mother’s Birthplace: Pennsylvania, Employer, Employee or Other: Employer, Household Members: Isaac L Lyons 72, Eva Lyons 63, Randolph Lyons 30, Eva Page 32, Henry Page 10, Lyons Page 5, Henrietta Lyons 45, Barbara Hawkins 75, Angele Hazur 70, Mary Oubre 28, Mathilde Wiggley 28, David Jones 33 – 1910 United States Federal Census
1923: Isaac Lazarus Lyons, Death 14 Nov 1923 (aged 85–86), Burial, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana – U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
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