Heckler Auction 105 – Looking at Paint on Bottles

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Heckler Auction 105 – Looking at Paint on Bottles

CarlSturmMug

From the late Carl Sturm Collection

09 September 2013

CarlSturmShort Apple-Touch-IconAThe folks at Heckler have another outstanding auction that closes this Wednesday evening. This is one of their ‘Opportunity’ auctions meaning it is not a ‘full fledged higher dollar catalog event’. The bottles and presentation photography are extraordinary as usual.

ScrollPaintHeckler

Lot: 126 Scroll Flask, probably Louisville Glass Works, Louisville, Kentucky, 1845-1860. Deep root beer amber with a puce tone, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (light high point wear). GIX-34 A beautiful flask. Fine condition. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

What I wanted to look at here were a few of the ‘painted’ bottles from the late Carl Sturm collection. Carl was an extraordinary man, with an extraordinary collection who obviously preferred paint on his bottles. I suspect we will see more of Carl’s collection in upcoming Heckler auctions. Many of you do not like paint on bottles as I monitor the conversations on facebook etc. Some collectors apply the ‘removable paint’ for presentation and readability. My father liked painted typography on bottles even though I didn’t and I told him. It did not matter. When I was at the legendary John Feldmann’s house looking at his great bottle collection, many of the ‘secondary’ bottles were in an adjacent room without display windows, contrary to his killer window room. The bottles were primarily amber bitters squares and painted with white graphics. Neither John, nor any viewer like myself could have ever read or understood what each bottle was because the lighting was dim and there was wood behind the bottles. The paint made it work. To each his own. Many of the older collectors prefer and preferred this method. I even have a few bottles with painted graphics. It is interesting, when I put the painted bottles in windows, you really cannot see the paint. Of course, I can always remove the paint. Just don’t use sandpaper! Here are a few of Carl’s bottles in the Heckler auction. Let’s look at these with respect. As someone said on Facebook, “That is why there is Vanilla and Chocolate”.

DuckSwim_Heckler

Lot: 6 “Will You Take / A Drink / Will A / (Duck) / Swim?” Pictorial Flask, probably Lockport Glass Works, Lockport, New York, 1870-1880. Aquamarine, tooled sloping collared mouth with ring – smooth base, half pint. GXIII-29a Strong embossing. Fine condition. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

PortraitPaintHeckler

Lot: 175 Byron – Scott Portrait Flask, a Stoddard glasshouse, Stoddard, New Hampshire, 1840-1860. Yellowish olive, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (light high point wear). GI-114 Great color. Fine condition. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

TwoMenArguing_Heckler

Lot: 19 Two Men Arguing – Grotesque Man’s Head Pictorial Flask, Europe, 1830-1860. Brilliant cobalt blue, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (minor exterior high point wear). GX-12 Brilliant, beautiful color. Fine condition. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

OurChoice_Heckler

Lot: 37 “Our Choice / Cleve & Steve / November 8th 92 / March 4th 93″ And Busts – Rooster Portrait Flask, America, 1892-1893. Medium golden amber, tooled sloping collared mouth with ring – smooth base, half pint. GI-124 Strong mold impression. Fine condition. This flask is accompanied by a related souvenir advertising coin and banner. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

EagleGrapes_Heckler

Lot: 47 Eagle – Grapes Historical Flask, Coffin and Hay Manufactory, Hammonton, New Jersey, 1836-1847. Brilliant golden amber, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (1 inch by 1 inch piece has been broken away and reglued to mouth). GII-56 Outstanding rare color. Numerous bubbles. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

PikesPeak_Heckler

Lot: 56 “For Pike’s Peak” And Prospector – Eagle Historical Flask, America, 1860-1870. Medium yellowish amber, applied square collared mouth – smooth base, half pint; (1/2 inch bruise and crack on mouth, multiple 1 inch hairline fissures near base). GXI-23 Strong mold impression. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

LaFayetteCoventry_Heckler

Lot: 105 “Lafayette” And Bust – Liberty Cap Portrait Flask, Coventry Glass Works, Coventry, Connecticut, 1824-1825. Bright yellow olive, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (minor high point wear, 1/8 inch bruise in shoulder). GI-86 Beautiful color. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

PittsburghEagle_Heckler

Lot: 107 Eagle And “Pittsburgh / PA” – Eagle Historical Flask, Pittsburgh district, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1860-1870. Medium greyish olive green, applied double collared mouth – smooth base, half pint; (1/8 inch by 3/8 inch chip from lower mouth ring, overall wear). GII-109 Good color. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

CornucopiaUrn_Heckler

Lot: 129 Cornucopia – Urn Pictorial Flask, Keene Marlboro Street Glassworks, Keene, New Hampshire, 1820-1840. Medium blue green, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (minor high point wear). GIII-7 Pretty color. Good mold impression. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

BiningersTravelers_Heckler

Lot: 142 “Bininger’s / Travelers / Guide / A.M.Bininger & Co. / No. 19 Broad St. N.Y.” Pocket Flask, America, 1860-1870. Bright yellow amber, applied double collared mouth – smooth base, half pint. Beautiful lighter color. Fine condition. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

Railroad_Heckler

Lot: 229 “Lowell / Railroad” And Horse And Cart – Eagle Historical Flask, Coventry Glass Works, Coventry, Connecticut, 1820-1840. Brilliant yellow olive, sheared mouth – pontil scar, half pint; (shallow 1/8 inch by 1/4 inch flake off mouth, 1/8 inch mouth bruise). GV-10 Pretty color. Carl Sturm collection. – Heckler Auction 105

About Ferdinand Meyer V

Ferdinand Meyer V, President, Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors, is a native of Baltimore, Maryland and has a BFA in Fine Art and Graphic Design from the Kansas City Art Institute and School of Design. Ferdinand is the founding Principal of FMG Design, a nationally recognized design consultation firm. Ferdinand is a passionate collector of American historical glass specializing in bitters bottles, color runs and related classic figural bottles. Ferdinand is married to Elizabeth Jane Meyer and lives in Houston, Texas with their daughter and three wonderful grandchildren. The Meyers are also very involved in Quarter Horses, antiques and early United States postage stamps.
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